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Roybi WDS 1600

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Forum topic by dickjo posted 12-03-2013 03:49 PM 1103 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dickjo

10 posts in 1096 days


12-03-2013 03:49 PM

I have a Roybi WDS1600 that I bought about 10 years ago and never used until now. The tension clamp does not work right. When the paper is in the clamp, it slips. The arm of the clamp seems bent. How do I get to it?
Thanks,
Dick


10 replies so far

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

137 posts in 2071 days


#1 posted 12-03-2013 04:01 PM

Due to a bad experience with a pos sliding table saw and customer service from roybi that is one brand of tool that I will never buy.

If someone gve me any roybi tool I would just throw it in the trash…....

-- .. heyoka ..

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#2 posted 12-03-2013 04:12 PM

It’s Ryobi, not Roybi. It looks like it’s a knockoff of the Performax.
If you don’t have a manual, google “ryobi wds1600 manual” without the quotes and the first result takes you to ncwoodworking site with a link to the manual, now made by someone else. That manual has clear pictures somewhere around page 20 on how it’s supposed to look, so you can tell if it really is bent, and how to adjust it.
It might not be bent, and it might not be the fact that Ryobi made tools for Toys-R-Us, it might just be they copied a poorly designed clip from the early Performax or that you’re not sticking the end of the paper in correctly. When I bought my old performax it too would slip because I couldn’t get it in the right place without hanging upside down from the ceiling with that weird wrench in one hand, the tip of the paper in the other, a flashlight held in my teeth and 12 cheerleaders outside waving their pom-poms in unison. It has to go through the correct opening while you hold that cheesy little spring-loaded lever open and blindly try to pull it tight without actually pulling the tip off.
Good Luck.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1252 posts in 3005 days


#3 posted 12-03-2013 04:35 PM

I bought that sander years ago, it would not stay parallel with the table, so I sold it the first chance I got, I still use my Ryobi spindle sander but only because the local lumber yard ordered ( and paid for) a new oscillating part shortly after I purchased it,
I also won’t buy any more Ryobi products

-- Smitty!!!

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dickjo

10 posts in 1096 days


#4 posted 12-03-2013 05:50 PM

I have the drum out and still can not figure how to remove the clamp. When the clamp is closed, there is almost 1/8” between the drum and clamp. The clamp is right next to one of the section bars,which makes getting your finger in there almost impossible. The tension spring seems to be in the wrong place. Someone told me to use an abrasive to hold the paper on?
Thanks
DICK

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dickjo

10 posts in 1096 days


#5 posted 12-03-2013 05:52 PM

i MEANT ADHESIVE NOT ABRASIVE

View charliebrown's profile

charliebrown

2 posts in 1025 days


#6 posted 02-11-2014 02:32 PM

I just bought a 2001 WDS1600 and am impressed (so far) with how well it works. It’s not meant to be a planer and you if you use for surfacing and not planing I think it will work well. The clamp has two simultaneous requirements. It squeezes together AND pushes toward the rear of the machine. It’s tricky, but once you figure it out you can change paper in a couple minutes. I jam a rubber handled screwdriver under the drum to keep it from moving. I had a Grizzly in the past. Now, if you want paper that’s REALLY hard to change, try a Grizzly.

-- cbrown

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woodsmithshop

1252 posts in 3005 days


#7 posted 02-12-2014 12:52 AM

if you get the velcro upgrade kit for the Grizzly it is not so hard to change, I got the upgrade and it works sooo much better now than it did.

-- Smitty!!!

View Tom Huntley's profile

Tom Huntley

50 posts in 2699 days


#8 posted 03-11-2014 11:33 AM

Dickjo, The clip is held in place by a spring ring around the drum shaft. You need a pair of separator pliers to open the ring, and then it will slide off the shaft. I was able to loosen the spring retainer ring while the unit was still assembled, and slide the paper clip out for some examination. My clip still works well, but I notice the hinge pin is starting to get loose, so it’s only a matter of time before it goes. I’ve ordered two replacement clips, and they are on backorder. (from other posts, it sounds like I may see them when You-know-where freezes over. Given our temps in Michigan over the past few weeks, it seemed like that might actually happen. I digress…)

My BIG question to you is this: How did you get your drum out? I’ve loosened the bearing retainers, dropped the compression rollers, etc., but cannot get the bearings to give up their hold on the shaft. Design doesn’t look like a press-fit bearing is specified. The location of the bearing in the assembly makes using a conventional puller impossible. Now I’m thinking I may have to fabricate a tool just to service my used $200 used drum sander.

BTW, to all reading this post. When this bugger works, I LOVE IT!. So far, I appear to have had better luck than most. Let’s see how it goes with this paper clip dilemma. I may be on a collision course with disaster.

As an earlier poster noted, if you pull the clip assembly to its full travel, you may be inserting the paper behind the gripper. There are two tensioning systems in play here that work well, when they are working properly. A light duty clip pinches the paper against a metal surface, and then the whole assembly rotates backward against the pressure of a much larger spring which keeps the paper tight. Sometimes, the pulling motion causes the gripper to grab the paper so tightly that I have to reach in with a tiny screwdriver and pop the light clip loose in order to get the paper out! If you get a dental mirror and a good “head light” miner’s flashlight, you can study this yourself and see how it works. I too had the floppy paper problem, until I figured out how the system was intended to work.

-- Tom Huntley - Rochester Hills, Michigan

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dickjo

10 posts in 1096 days


#9 posted 03-11-2014 02:53 PM

Tom
I took it all apart.

I removed the drum from the bearings by holding the drum on a bench and using a long bar and hammer to drive it out of the other end. Be careful to only hit on the outside edge of the bearing. Hit all around so that the bearing only moves a small amt each time is hit. Before you remove the large paper clamp, take some pictures that show exactly how the large spring is on. The same goes for the small clamp on the other end. The clamps are held together with what looks like cut off nails. Rube Goldberg, but when together, it works good.

Let me know how it worked
Dick

View Tom Huntley's profile

Tom Huntley

50 posts in 2699 days


#10 posted 03-11-2014 03:05 PM

Dick,

Great idea (I love this site!)... and, thanks for your reply. I’m assuming you passed the bar through the inside of the drum, between the spokes. In my frustration to deal with the problem, I overlooked this approach! Thanks again. It may be a week or so before I have time to futz with it again, but when I do, I will post the outcome here. I rep some tooling companies that may be open to a small favor. Once I get a good picture of how this works, I may have them machine a new clip mechanism for me. These guys will likely make something more precise than a Rolex!

Best to you!
Tom

-- Tom Huntley - Rochester Hills, Michigan

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