LumberJocks

Save me from myself (if you can or want to)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by nailbanger2 posted 12-01-2013 06:43 PM 1027 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


12-01-2013 06:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question milling tablesaw

Hi fellow LJ’s, I’ve got a little nagging problem rattling around my head that I hope you can help me with. I have recently started Spalm'shttp://lumberjocks.com/SPalm/blog/17488 steps cutting board. He writes up in great detail how to achieve this amazing design. I urge you all to read it. As a matter of fact, to help me with my problem, it is neccesary to do so or at least be familiar with his process. So, I have been following his instructions, and I’m ready for the second glue up, the hard one.

While I am less than comfortable with this next challenge, that is not the problem. As I was cutting the triangular “logs”, I was using my crosscutting sled. The blade has to be quite high, but I had no problems. It occurred to me, however, that I could glue the “logs” together in their long form before crosscutting.

The picture is just a dry fit, but it should give you an idea of what I mean. Once they were glued together, I would then crosscut the entire stack on a sled with the blade no higher than it is anyway. I would probably add some clamping apparatus also. As I see it, the downside is there could be gaps that are hidden from view, rendering all that wood and my time up til that point useless. If anyone has done this before, or can find some safety reason it shouldn’t be done, please join in!

As I said to start, I’ve crosscut enough “stratego” pieces to make at least one board, so this theory won’t stop me from finishing. But, if there’s an easier way, I’m just lazy enough to find it. Thanks in advance.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew


8 replies so far

View degoose's profile

degoose

7196 posts in 2814 days


#1 posted 12-01-2013 07:54 PM

An obvious progression to the build… like to see if it works… just make sure there is plenty of glue…and plenty of clamps all the way along…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

441 posts in 1323 days


#2 posted 12-01-2013 08:16 PM

Good job man. It blows my noodle when I see people cutting individual pieces to make a board, without ever realizing you could do it the way you’ve demonstrated. Bravo.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/UncannyValleyWoods?ref=hdr_shop_menu

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

276 posts in 2066 days


#3 posted 12-01-2013 10:59 PM

I have never built an end grain cutting board but as i see it if you glue all of this together you will have the pattern move diagonally when you glue the rips back together. If you saved some individual pieces to fill this back in I think you could save yourself allot of time

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5256 posts in 3341 days


#4 posted 12-02-2013 01:37 AM

That seems like a fair challenge that needs to be met.

It looks like you have done a superb job of getting everything very well fitting. I would say go for it. Lots of glue will fill gaps. This seems like the best idea for a real challenging glue up.

But then you don’t get to play Stratego with the pieces :)
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#5 posted 12-02-2013 01:41 AM

Thank you all for the feedback, and yes, I will take the challenge and then report back to you all. And Steve, I already have those two buckets for a game. :)

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#6 posted 12-02-2013 06:32 PM

That is fantastic, but I would not use it for cutting or chopping. I would think that kind of punishment and moisture would have an effect on the glue joints and risk coming apart.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5256 posts in 3341 days


#7 posted 12-02-2013 07:24 PM

Just to prove a point. This board was designed and built over 1200 days ago. Here is a picture of it today. It lives on the counter as our main cutting board, and has had a lot of use. My wife is a foodie and chops on it every day. We slice all of our own bread. I wash it with soap and water, and then oil it every couple of months. It looks great, but the cherry has darkened to about the color of the walnut.
.

.
Never sanded or re-glued.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#8 posted 12-03-2013 12:31 PM

It still looks great, Steve.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com