LumberJocks

Table saw stabilizer question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 237 days ago 891 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14589 posts in 2274 days


237 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: table saw stabilizer question arbor washer

I was just reading this American Woodworker blog.

I’m not having any of these issues with my ancient Craftsman contractor saw, but I am wondering if using a stabilizer to replace the stamped metal arbor washer on one side of the blade would be a good idea? Just one would not move the blade and the throat plate would be just fine. The machined washer should be better than a stamped one.

Any thoughts or experiences?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


20 replies so far

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1231 days


#1 posted 237 days ago

My thoughts. I’ve heard plenty of people rave about the improvement the stabilizer made, but I’ve never heard anyone say anything particularly negative…..besides it being a waste of money. That said, it couldn’t hurt to try one.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14589 posts in 2274 days


#2 posted 237 days ago

Mostly, I guess I’m wondering about adding a bigger, heavier object to just one side of the blade?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2439 posts in 949 days


#3 posted 237 days ago

I do it and I think it helps, esp. on thin kerf blades. Another thing you can do is flatten the face of the stamped metal arbor washer. It is easy to do w/ piece of sandpaper on the cast iron top, knocks down any potential high spots.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14589 posts in 2274 days


#4 posted 237 days ago

Bondo, You use stabilizers or just on one side?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5369 posts in 1974 days


#5 posted 237 days ago

Topa, I don’t know the correct technical answer, so take my guess for what it’s worth…. I’d guess that the original stock washer is sized to work optimally opposite the stock flange. Most flanges and washers are dished at the bore and distribute the clamping pressure toward the outer edge which should create fairly equal pressure between the two at approximately the same distance from the bore…..not sure that replacing the washer with a stabilizer would work quite the same way. That doesn’t mean that adding a stabilizer disc will hurt anything, though it’d be good to make sure that it’s not intended to be part of a two-plate set….there are two disc stabilizer sets that are intended to be used as part of set that are different than the single disc stabilizers.

FWIW, I’ve never tried replacing the washer with a stabilizer, but I’ve adding a stabilizer along with the stock washer, and never found any improvements from it. In general, a stabilizer shouldn’t be necessary on a saw with low runout that’s runs smoothly, and uses a good quality blade.

Flattening your stock washer could be helpful too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14589 posts in 2274 days


#6 posted 237 days ago

knotscott, That makes sense to me. I was just wondering about any issues that might pup up without ever having seen a pair of these. I can see where that could easily introduce undesirable stresses if the stabilizer is a larger diameter than the arbor flange.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3046 posts in 1274 days


#7 posted 237 days ago

Topa I agree with Knotscott. I don’t use a stabilizer. Maybe I should but I don’t think my washers are stamped. I don’t think they could easily stamp a washer that is undercut in the center and grips on the outer rim. I do think these should be used with a mating part that is the same diameter and that grips the same. Without the mating half on the other side of the blade, the washer would cause the blade to deflect don’t you think? If you can install the tire rims on your car or truck and not properly tighten the lug nuts and warp the brake rotors, then why couldn’t you warp a blade with only 1 washer? You can warp the brake rotors so why run a risk like ruining your blade. Personally, I think about half the gimmicks out there to buy are just that….gimmicks.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14589 posts in 2274 days


#8 posted 237 days ago

I never thought about them being bigger than the flange until knotscott mentioned it. Of course, I have never seen a pair in real time ;-) I’m not having any issues so I’ll let my curiosity wane ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3046 posts in 1274 days


#9 posted 237 days ago

you are thinking like a politician. LOL You are trying to protect yourself from yourself…....ha ha ha

I do think things should be used in pairs on each side of the blade. I have never used a stabilizer nor have I seen one that I can remember. You and your curiosity…ha ha

This is about like thinking about electron pushing each other inside a wire. If we cut the wire do the elctrons fall out on the floor? LOL

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1231 days


#10 posted 237 days ago

I thought all stabilizers came in pairs??
If so, you’d need to get/make new ZCIs…..if you use them. Thats a possible downside.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2439 posts in 949 days


#11 posted 237 days ago

I just use one, have been for years, never a problem, they are not dished, but flat.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3046 posts in 1274 days


#12 posted 237 days ago

The washers on saws are dished and only touch the blade around the edges. At least some of them are this way.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2159 days


#13 posted 237 days ago

The washer on my saw is dished, and its outer diameter matches the outer diameter of the arbor flange.

The arbor flange is machined and the washer is stamped. The washer’s outer rim presses the blade against the machined (flat) rim on the arbor flange which keeps the blade flat. Therefore, the washer doesn’t have to be dead flat.

-- Joe

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3342 posts in 2559 days


#14 posted 237 days ago

Used a pair on my old RAS. Sold ‘em with the saw. I used TK blades on the RAS, and they seemed to preclude any flutter.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2378 posts in 2125 days


#15 posted 237 days ago

It looks like there are two types of blade accessories being discussed here.

Stabilizers are used in pairs and commonly have a diameter of 3” or so, for example these. I think of these as replacing the surfaces provided by the saw’s arbor flange and washer with larger ones. I have never used these.

The other type is larger and meant to be used alone on the outside of the blade. Forrest calls them Dampeners/Stiffeners and sells them in diameters of 4”, 5”, 6”, 7”, 8”, 10”. They recommend using this 5” version for a 10” blade. In general, the recommendation is 1/2 – 2/3 the blade diameter. This does not replace the saw’s washer. You still use the washer. I think of these as a way to have the stability of a thicker blade and the advantages of a thin kerf. I use one of these with my thin-kerf ripping blade.

-- “That it will never come again / Is what makes life so sweet. ” ― Emily Dickinson

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase