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Tables saw horspower difference?

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Forum topic by Micah Muzny posted 11-29-2013 09:14 PM 1063 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Micah Muzny

183 posts in 480 days


11-29-2013 09:14 PM

Hey I am checking out some tablesaws and wondering how much of a difference is there in a 1.5 or 1.75 hp table compared to a 2hp table saw? Is the cutting speed just a little slower?


20 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2034 posts in 1240 days


#1 posted 11-29-2013 09:29 PM

Yep, so little you won’t notice it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7822 posts in 2395 days


#2 posted 11-29-2013 09:48 PM

The lower hp saws have more trouble with thick stock. If you’re
just cutting plywood and mostly 4/4 hardwoods a 1.5 or 2 hp
motor works pretty well with good blades.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1860 posts in 2308 days


#3 posted 11-29-2013 09:48 PM

The difference may be specmanship, and the actual power is the same.

-- Joe

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2123 days


#4 posted 11-29-2013 09:58 PM

Not much difference in those motors …blade selection and alignment will make a much bigger difference.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

183 posts in 480 days


#5 posted 11-29-2013 10:01 PM

What about 8/4 lumber? Or like 2×4’s 2×6’s etc.? It would’t cut as fast as thinner stock but will cut it fine right if I don’t force it? Couldn’t I just cut half way through then make another pass to cut the rest?

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

791 posts in 920 days


#6 posted 11-29-2013 10:05 PM

It will cut 2” stock just fine. When you get into 3 or 4” stock you might have to slow your feed rate down or get a thin kerf blade.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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bondogaposis

2748 posts in 1098 days


#7 posted 11-29-2013 10:51 PM

Manufacturers have gotten pretty creative in computing horsepower, take a look at the amp ratings on the motor for a truer way to compare brands. Also there are difference between universal motors and induction motors. The better saws have induction motors, generally.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 2046 days


#8 posted 11-29-2013 11:08 PM

“Not much difference in those motors …blade selection and alignment will make a much bigger difference.”

This.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2246 posts in 2294 days


#9 posted 11-29-2013 11:20 PM

HP rating and actual power of cut can be confusing at times. Up until yesterday, we were running our shop with a Grizzly saw with a 4 hp 16 amp Leeson, and 2 Unisaws that both had 3 hp motors installed. The 4 hp Grizzly seems to possess similar cutting power as the 2 Unisaws with 3 hp motors. In fact, one of our Unisaws with a 3 hp motor seemed to be strongest saw out of all 3 table saws. That particular saw sold 2 days ago.

All 3 saws are fairly well aligned and perform very well. However when comparing power of cut we have fences and fence alignment to consider, arbor bearings, pulleys, belts, more importantly the blade itself. Many things can help or detract from the power of cut and HP and amp ratings are just one of those things.

I do agree the difference in power from a 1.5 hp motor to a 2 hp motor is likely very minimal. I once had a 2 hp Delta hybrid saw and it seemed equal in power to the ridgid 1.5 hp table saws we owned back then.

I will say that 1.5 to 2 hp saws sure can build a lot of stuff with no problem at all. I built a ton of things with our first ever saw which was a Craftsman bench style saw that only sells for 150.00 brand new. The motor was probably like 1/2 hp or something like that. Of course the saw stated it was a 3.0 hp but that was not true. But with a sharp blade it would not back down from anything and just seemed to muscle through. It really was nothing more than a circular saw flipped upside down.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5119 posts in 2460 days


#10 posted 12-29-2013 09:33 PM

I thought it wasn’t possible to get a true two horsepower motor to run on your normal 110 circuit, don’t you need a 220 circuit to provide enough energy to run a motor that is really 2 hp?

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

174 posts in 580 days


#11 posted 12-29-2013 09:49 PM

”I thought it wasn’t possible to get a true two horsepower motor to run on your normal 110 circuit, don’t you need a 220 circuit to provide enough energy to run a motor that is really 2 hp?”

It depends on the capacity of the 110v circuit. Technically, an efficient 3hp motor will run on a 110v, 20A circuit. I know it will work because I’ve done it. Several years ago, my first cabinet saw had a 3hp motor and came wired to plug into 110V. I operated it that way for a short time until I added 220V circuits for the saw and a dust collector.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View DKV's profile

DKV

3194 posts in 1251 days


#12 posted 12-29-2013 10:23 PM

Are the motors really 1.5 and 1.75?
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/55751

-- Have fun and laugh alot. Life can end at any moment. You old guys out there know what I mean...

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2021 days


#13 posted 12-29-2013 11:30 PM

Depends on the age of the saw/motor. I have a Powermatic 65 cabinet saw built in June, 1964 with a 1-1/2 hp motor. It will breeze through 12/4 oak with no problems. The horse and half motors of today would bog down and probably trip the breaker at the same feed rate.

If you want to know the true strength of the motor, look at the plate and see what the amperage draw is and then compare it to this chart:

Motor Size 120 volts 240 volts

1/4 hp. 6 amp. 3 amp.
1/3 hp. 7 amp. 3½ amp.
1/2 hp. 10 amp. 5 amp.
3/4 hp. 14 amp. 7 amp.
1 hp. 16 amp. 8 amp.
1½ hp. 20 amp. 10 amp.
2 hp. 24 amp. 12 amp.
3 hp. 34 amp. 17 amp.
5 hp. 56 amp. 28 amp.

A true 1hp motor is the largest you can run on 120v. Anything above that needs 220. If it has a 110 plug on it, just figure it’s 1hp or lower.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

174 posts in 580 days


#14 posted 12-30-2013 12:14 AM

A true 1hp motor is the largest you can run on 120v. Anything above that needs 220. If it has a 110 plug on it, just figure it’s 1hp or lower.

Why do you say that, Steve?

The capacity of the circuit is what matters. When I bought my first “3hp” cabinet saw, it came with a 110V plug on it. It ran just fine on the circuit in my garage which was 120V, 20A. I added 220V circuits and changed it because I was updating other tools as well. In most cases, the HP rating is based on the amount of current (amps) the motor draws in a stall condition, not normal operating conditions.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View lunn's profile

lunn

207 posts in 1056 days


#15 posted 12-30-2013 12:18 AM

On the subject of electric motors. On my old Parks planer i guess it’t the orignal motor Starts at a low speed then hits warp drive after a few min. of running. It has a different set of brushes that kick in. Then if it boggs it kicks back into low speed and chuggs on thru it. I’ve never seen one before, Is it common on old power tools It’s huge 110v i believe 1hp i but i can’t see the data plate

-- What started as a hobbie is now a full time JOB!

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