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Forum topic by Micah Muzny posted 11-27-2013 06:26 AM 1126 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


11-27-2013 06:26 AM

I am looking at purchasing the Jet EVS2 2hp wood lathe. It is a 230v and says 6.1 amps. It shows a picture of the plug, it is 3 prongs, 2 are flat and the ground is the rounded one. How do I know if it is the Nema 6-15 plug or the 6-30 plug? I am wondering it will fit the same outlet as the 230v window ac unit. I am going to be putting it in a shop which I dont have yet but the shop has a spot for a 230v ac window unit, I dont have the ac yet, and I dont have the lathe yet. How can I figure out if they match up or not? I want to be able to get the lathe during the black friday sales so I can save $400, if it wasnt for this reason I would just wait till I had the building but it wont be here until next week at the soonest probably. The size of the window unit would be one that has cooling and heating capabilities for about 400 sq feet if that helps any.


20 replies so far

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1894 days


#1 posted 11-27-2013 06:38 AM

If you look at the diagram inside the motor terminal cover you will see the configuration for wiring this to 120V AC.
In this configuration the motor will pull about 13/14 amps so you will need a 20Amp outlet at 120V – No need to worry about having to connect to the A/Conditioner plug. Happy turning.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View Pete_Jud's profile

Pete_Jud

424 posts in 3219 days


#2 posted 11-27-2013 06:43 AM

Easy to wire an outlet for the plug, If in you can’t do it yourself, hire some one that can do it for you.

-- Life is to short to own an ugly boat.

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Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


#3 posted 11-27-2013 06:48 AM

Well if I was just going to use it at 120v level I would just get the 1.5hp model. I am mainly just trying to figure out if the lathe is the same plug type as the A/C plug. The building was ordered originally to have a spot wired to use a 230v Air conditioner. That was before my old lathe kicked the bucket, so I am just considering to use that plug for my lathe and just get a 120v A/C. My problem is I am not sure if the lathe and the A/C would be the same plug type.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#4 posted 11-27-2013 07:01 AM

The Nema 6-15 plug and the 6-30 pictures look about the same, but the 30 will be the size of a dryer outlet and the 15 will be the size of a normal household outlet.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 1493 days


#5 posted 11-27-2013 07:03 AM

Most 220v appliances use a 20 amp circuit. Check your breaker to verify this. To find which type plug is which google nema 6-15 or whatever and look at the results. I did that to figure out what my plugs where called when I first started. I forget now what they were called after buying what I needed. In the first page of results I found a page that had pictures of all the different kinds of plugs and their arrangement. At 6 amp you can always change the plug on the end of your tool if you have to, it perfectly safe to upgrade the tool to a plug that can handle higher amps. Not so smart to go down.

My outlets which are typical have the center rounded ground, and a horizontal flat prong and a 3rd prong that has a shape like a plus that is missing the left inside leg. Depending on the amp rating of the tool, the plug on the tool may have 2 horizontal flat prongs, or 1 horizontal and 1 vertical. Ive also seen tools that had a plug with a matching legless plus. Either of these plugs will fit safely into my outlets which are rated at 20 amps. If you have a 30 amp circuit, you may have something entirely different, or you may have a 30 amp breaker with 20 amp plugs, while not necessarily kosher by a electrician standards, it would still be safe. If you do have 30 amp circuit and outlet, Either change the plug on the end of your tool, or get a piece of 12 or 10 gauge romex and make a little extension cord with female and male plugs to make the proper conversion. Personally that last option is the way I would go. I like to keep my molded cords intact and it easy to make a cord.

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Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


#6 posted 11-27-2013 07:16 AM

Ok I have done some research and I found that it will not. I discovered the A/C units are 230v 20amp 6-20 plug types and the lathe is a Nema 230v 6-30 plug type. Thanks everyone for you help and ideas, seems that I am in for some big decisions. I prefer not to rewire machines, so my option is get a smaller machine or get someone to wire in some more outlets.

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Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


#7 posted 11-27-2013 07:18 AM

Now that my page refreshed I see you guys answered my question already before I found the answer myself haha. You guys are good!

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 1493 days


#8 posted 11-27-2013 07:24 AM

Or better yet, take my suggestion, get the tool you want, and make a little extension cord. You will probably need that anyway. Very cheap solution to put a couple plugs on a piece of wire. Much better than rewiring plugs,machines, or outlets, or hiring a electrician.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#9 posted 11-27-2013 07:28 AM

It is a 230v and says 6.1 amps It would surprise me if they put a 30 plug on the 6 amp load.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#10 posted 11-27-2013 07:30 AM

Hold it, Hold it, hold it!! hiring an electrician is the best way to go! ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 1493 days


#11 posted 11-27-2013 07:35 AM

TopMax, I would be surprised to see a 30 amp plug on a 6 amp tool as well, but would not be surprised to see a 15 or 20 amp plug on one, and i believe that is the type of difference between the 2 plugs I described. And frankly, If I can avoid having one of them idiot clowns who charge 3 figures per hour in my house, I will.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 1493 days


#12 posted 11-27-2013 07:48 AM

I count my blessings on this electrical stuff. I have a ex-electrician and a ex building inspector who are both super knowledgeable in these things and have been helping me wire up my garage/shop. Outer walls are concrete block which Ive added sheetrock too so conduit was the way to go. And I wanted to put in a switch on a 220v circuit for my dust collector so I would not have to crawl into my closet to turn it on and off. I also wanted to be safe and do it right. The electrician works at a lighting and electrical house, the building inspector works at a local hardware store in a town of about 5000, counting the cattle, horses, dogs, cats, and goldfish. In all such things, i find it worthwhile to talk with your vendors and learn their backgrounds if you can. Amazing how good some of them can be.

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jonah

687 posts in 2765 days


#13 posted 11-27-2013 08:50 AM

You can almost certainly remove the stock cord and plug from the lathe without damaging it, if that is your concern. Then just replace it with a cord that matches the outlet type you’ll be plugging it into. It’s perfectly safe and easy. Alternatively you could make an extension cord as instructed above, though I am no fan of solid core 10/12 AWG extension cords – they are unwieldy and stiff.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 1493 days


#14 posted 11-27-2013 08:59 AM

I agree Jonah on both points, but he said he did not want to rewire the machine. A lathe is not a mobile station really, once it is situated, it will pretty well stay put. Not like most of my other machines which I am constantly pulling out from the wall in order to get clearance for those 8 or longer foot boards to slice dice, etc. Personally I have only 1 220v outlet in my garage, and mostly it usually drives my dust collector plugged straight into it. Im working on that closet I spoke of, and nearing completion. In the meantime, my grizzly table saw gets connected with a 30 foot long homemade extension cord, no conversions involved, and I keep it near the edge of my garage. My dust collection is super easy, I push the 1023rlx about 7 feet out and to the side so it in front of my garage, but outside, plug it in with my unwieldy and stiff extension cord, and give my dust to God.

Clean up is so easy, it rains in Alabama at least once a week except in August, and than there is always the wind.

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johnstoneb

2147 posts in 1639 days


#15 posted 11-27-2013 02:01 PM

Change the plug to fit the outlet if necessary. You’re only pullin 6amps on each lag so a 20 amp plug would be more than enough plug.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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