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Forum topic by SirTonka posted 11-23-2013 08:10 PM 1472 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


11-23-2013 08:10 PM

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20 replies so far

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swoper

59 posts in 2692 days


#1 posted 11-23-2013 09:48 PM

I have them thru my whole barn, the post and beam constructed frame built with poplar a 100 years ago is infested, they don’t attack my pine bench or cabinets. I don’t leave good wood overnite in the shop but as far as offcuts go I have not seen them go after oak or cherry just the poplar. My g/f did buy a chemical powder to treat them but the warnings about improper use made me a little too worried, besides I would have to coat every square inch of frame to do a good job and how do you coat where the planks attach to the frame. The hot house treatment sounds good, maybe a foot square by 10 long and run heat tape or heated air thru it. good luck I wish I had a steel building so I could fix my infestation.

-- Harry, Jackson Mi

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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#2 posted 11-24-2013 01:53 AM

swoper, thought up of a way to target the infected areas with the necessary heat, by simply using an electric blanket. This should do the trick for heating up your post and beam. Only issue is to use a relatively new and safe model. Temp ranges are 150-250+F

Still trying to think of an idea on how to inoculate the shop clay floor and immediate surrounding areas without going the chemical route.

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swoper

59 posts in 2692 days


#3 posted 11-24-2013 05:26 AM

sir tonka my barn is 24×36 and 25 at the peak, ain’t gonna try getting up that high to kill the little buggers. I do have my work area ceiling covered with plastic to keep the dust off of the tools and I just have learned to buy and rough mill the wood then take into house to store till i need it.

-- Harry, Jackson Mi

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 2426 days


#4 posted 11-25-2013 04:23 PM

Spray everything you can with a borate based bug killer, available at just about any wood supply store, and clean the area of all dust and shavings, small pieces laying around, etc. The spray won’t stop the bugs inside the wood, but it will stop them on their way out and keep others from entering. I use “Borad” with good results. Burn whatever you don’t need, replace any wood that you can that is affected. You can’t tell if eggs have been laid or if they have hatched, so you will need to be patient; they live in wood for a couple years if they need to. Chemicals aren’t the most fun, but they work.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#5 posted 11-25-2013 04:31 PM

Boracare. Exterminator?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View SirTonka's profile

SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#6 posted 11-25-2013 07:56 PM

Toxicology of boric acid is rough for us humans, I choose to stay clear away from the stuff.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#7 posted 11-25-2013 08:32 PM

SirTonka
Boric Acid has been used for over 100 years to clean damaged eyes.

If you look at the toxicology, (AKA MSDS sheet), of oxygen, it is deadly also.

The alternative is to raise the temp above 140°F for a day or so, or spray alcohol everywhere, (also deadly to human life forms).

You asked for an answer, you got one, you didn’t like it.

Too bad.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#8 posted 11-25-2013 08:50 PM

Dallas, with all due respect I said in my reply post I did not want to go the chemical route.
Let’s do without the straw man argument and unwarranted attitude if you would be so kind.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#9 posted 11-26-2013 01:12 AM

Hunh?

How do you separate one from another?
Everything you eat, drink, breathe or touch is made up up chemicals..

Boric acid is not man made, therefore it must be naturally occurring.

If you want an answer that doesn’t involve chemicals, go to one of the “Green” websites, that, by the way, still use chemicals.

Speaking of attitude, it seems to me you added enough for everyone.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#10 posted 11-26-2013 02:45 AM

Dallas, In my opinion you have formed a false prejudice in your mind, taken a stance of bias, and are quick to generalize. You have no right to berate my due diligence concerning which chemicals are used in my shop, simple as that.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#11 posted 11-26-2013 03:04 AM

Hmmm, In my opinion, your personal bias is clouding your judgement and spreading irrational fears.

Has it occurred to you that boric acid is present in nearly every vegetable and fruit you eat?

It is a naturally occurring substance. It is already present in nearly every piece of wood you touch.

I am not berating your personal choices, I am simply questioning their validity.

You asked a question, you got valid answers and chose to ignore them or say that they weren’t viable.

I am simply asking you why you say they are not viable.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1904 days


#12 posted 11-26-2013 03:55 AM

SirTonka – Unfortunately Boric Acid is the ONLY treatment that will rid your shop of powder post beetles. This is not an immediate solution either. It can take around 3 years for the beetles, larva and eggs to all be eradicated. As Nomad62 stated the beetles have to pass through the borate (they ingest it when they eat their way out or in and die). Since the eggs are layed in the wood, any already there have to hatch and mature to beetles before they ingest the borate. This takes up to 3 years for the life cycle to complete.

Your project wood can be heated in a kiln (or microwaved if small enough) to “maybe” kill any infestation, but there is no guarantee that it will work. The only other treatment is tenting and fumigation. This however costs many thousands of dollars and is a very labor intensive project involving specialized experts.

I was a licensed pest control technician and had to deal with these on a daily basis.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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richardwootton

1699 posts in 1423 days


#13 posted 11-26-2013 04:38 AM

From what I understand Boric Acid is relatively safe for humans to come in contact with. I’m pretty sure you can buy it in a powdered form, dilute in water and spray infested areas. But if that isn’t the route you want to go you could try draping the entire place in tarp material or plastic sheeting during the summer months essentially creating a sort of solar kiln, and monitor the temperature within the place to ensure the temperature is regularly above 140, to accelerate this process you could add one or two space heaters to insure that the temp reaches excess of the desired temperature. Every other piece of scrap, dust, wood, etc. even the pine bench and wood outside, I personally would set a blaze. Then you would have plenty of plastic materials to build your own solar kiln which will enable you to purchase green lumber and dry it in a fraction of the time.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#14 posted 11-26-2013 05:03 AM

“Long term exposure to boric acid may be of more concern, causing kidney damage and eventually kidney failure” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boric_acid

“Reference dose that a person could be exposed to every day for the rest of their life with no appreciable risk of adverse health effects is 0.2 mg boron/kg/day.” “Commercial formulations of boric acid and borate salts include liquids (solutions, emulsifiable concentrates), granules, wettable powders, dusts, pellets, tablets, rods and baits in concentrations ranging from 1% to nearly 100%.” http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/borictech.html

Solubility in water 57g/1L

.5mg/kg-day Average Daily Dose with surface residue dislodgeable factor 10%

All this to say in a worst case exposure, levels are over the reference dose and the chance of adverse health effects occurring are increased. My mindset is to err on the side of caution, everything matters, and when unknown combinations of compounds are introduced into a work environment they can have a negative synergistic effect. There is much irony in modern life.

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SirTonka

67 posts in 1232 days


#15 posted 11-26-2013 05:14 AM

tefinn, thanks for the info, so far building a kiln and using an electric blanket are the options I am going with.

richard, like the idea of turning the entire shop into a kiln, I will at least go piecemeal around the shop with a smaller setup.

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