LumberJocks

What size lathe would I need to do bowl coring and other projects?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Micah Muzny posted 11-23-2013 04:13 PM 2743 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


11-23-2013 04:13 PM

Would 1.5hp be ok or is 2hp required? I am looking at the Jet EVS or the EVS2. I like that the EVS is 110v so easy to get access to a plug. If I got a EVS2 I would always have to use the the plug that my A/C would be in my shop. If I got the EVS 1.5hp 110v would I be able to do bowl coring if I wanted to try it? Also how limited to wood size would I be on a 1.5hp versus 2hp? Is there a big difference in 1.5hp and 2hp?


14 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#1 posted 11-23-2013 05:45 PM

I think either lathe will work, there is a learning curve to lathe operation, coring and different coring tools.

When Jet 1642 first came out both lathes motors rated 1.5 HP, over the years that change. Have the 1.5 HP version but no coring tools. Others with same lathe owning coring tools have not complained. Will 220V version give you more torque as claimed? I honestly do not know.

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3130 days


#2 posted 11-23-2013 09:08 PM

I would think the 1.5hp might be a little underpowered to use with a coring system.

A lot depends on the blank you are coring, the cutters used, etc.

The only coring system I have used was on a PM3520B (2hp 240v) with a OneWay coring system … had to take it easy with it to maintain speed and avoid burning.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#3 posted 11-23-2013 11:43 PM

This old article by Lyn J. Mangiameli about best ever read. Think will see there is a coring system for just about every lathe with at least 1 HP. Think they make a coring system for mini lathes now too.

http://www.morewoodturningmagazine.com/articles/coring.pdf

JMHO, the best or most versatile coring system is the old Stewart Slicer tool with arm brace. Think Sorby now sells that tool. Many homemade versions (boring bars) were popular many years ago when most old lathe had ¾ HP motors.

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/7/2/32/133/-/3179/Robert-Sorby-RS2000-Hollowing-System-Slicer-Tool?term=slicer+tool

Essentially cut a cone, which either fell out with lathe running or you snapped out using a wood chisel and mallet lathe off. Only used homemade boring bar with HSS tip, (not mine) really a time saver.

-- Bill

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


#4 posted 11-24-2013 01:13 AM

Does any company make a 2hp lathe that is 110v?

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3130 days


#5 posted 11-24-2013 01:54 AM

I doubt it … some manufacturers claim to have 2hp motors that run on 110vac (HF’s duct collector), but there are different ways to calculate ‘horsepower’.

You will often see the term ‘developed horsepower’. A 110vac motor can achieve 2+hp as a maximum with no-load, but likely not on a sustained basis.

More info: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/woodworking/motors/

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View SirTonka's profile

SirTonka

67 posts in 1231 days


#6 posted 11-24-2013 02:20 AM

I’d seriously consider a shopsmith with their new motor, http://www.shopsmithpowerpro.com/

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#7 posted 11-24-2013 05:46 PM

Grizzly says their G0462 lathe with digital read out, has a motor rated 2HP and 110V. I would not own a G0463 for several reasons, do not want to go into. Can read some old reviews on this lathe right here in REVIEWS SECTION or other places online.

Like Gerry said nothing out there in 2 HP 110V category. Will see several 1 ½ HP lathes with 220V like Rikon.

Instead of worrying about lathe HP, look at the Coring/Center saving systems out there including Sorby’s easy slicer and decide which one fits you needs. Except for Sorby Easy Slicer, all sold according to swing of lathe.

All the coring/center saver units out there only do one task. Sorby Easy Slicer with arm brace tad more versatile.

-- Bill

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2581 posts in 2428 days


#8 posted 11-24-2013 06:46 PM

Jet makes good lathes. If you are getting into turning, I suggest www.woodturner.org for tons of info for turning. I belong to a chapter in Dalton, GA and the members are most helpful to this newbie.
Keep in mind that once you buy a lathe, the accessories and tools will cost much more than the lathe. It would be easy to have $2K invested.

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1199 days


#9 posted 11-24-2013 10:55 PM

This will be my second lathe. The first one I got kicked the bucket and now I am looking to get a new one and hopefully my last one. I see toolnut.com will have powermatic and jet tools 15% blackfriday. I may just have to accidentally click buy on a powermatic 3520b. If my finger accidentally slips that day, I am sure it will not be a bad deal at all. Or how much does the 2hp jet compare to the 3520b? They both have 2hp motors, the swing is 16 on jet and 42 between centers, the PM is 20 swing and 35 between centers. Is this the only difference other than the weight? If so I could just add weight to the Jet.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#10 posted 11-25-2013 12:36 PM

If can run a separate 220V line go for the 3520B over Jet 1642. Like the Jet can add a shelf and weight. Yes, can both lathes shaking with wet or out of round pieces.

If money & electrical going to be a problem just buy the Jet 110V, 1642 lathe. Only optional gear have purchased so far is 6” robust tool rest. Only optional accessory want is a Lyle Jamiseson hollowing system. Adding a 1” bar can do deeper hollowing.

Good luck with whatever you get!

-- Bill

View Ron Ford's profile

Ron Ford

200 posts in 1199 days


#11 posted 11-28-2013 01:09 AM

I go with Tim the Tool Man’s mantra of “more power!” when it comes to something like this. I have a Jet 1442 EVS2 and it was well worth running a dedicated 220v line to run it. The lathe gives me all the power I have needed for any project I work on and I am more than happy with it.

-- Once in awhile I make something really great. Most days I just make sawdust.

View John's profile

John

469 posts in 737 days


#12 posted 12-05-2014 07:22 PM

I have a 1 1/2 HP on my Oneway. I have the Oneway coring system with the two smaller knives. It does slow down at times on me but I just ease off on the blade and then carry on. I bought the lathe when the opportunity came along. If I was ordering exactly what I wanted I’d go with the biggest HP available.

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3052 days


#13 posted 12-05-2014 09:56 PM

I would being a long term turner myself would have to advise you to think of a large motor in terms of horse power and also to buy three phase using an INVERTOR single to three phase model This will give you full torque with fantastic speed control.really needed nowadays for turning especially larger bowl turning.Read up on it please before coming to a permanent decision It truly is the way to go.and I have most of my lathes i e wood lathes set up this way it is much safer and easier to turn down big unwieldy out of shape bowl blanks,something belt changing cannot so easily accomplish.That is without your nerves being burned out LOL and no more having the lathe walk halfway across the shop floor till it is trued up. LOL Have safe fun.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#14 posted 12-06-2014 12:52 PM

If read that Lyn Mangiameli article will see where folks with 3 HP lathes stall lathes when coring. Each coring system out there has a learning curve. Whole process of coring about of cutting & clearing chips so blades does not bind. Wood species and moisture content will also affect on speed and final results.

If want to buy a lathe that will last you a life time either the Jets or Powermatic will serve you well. If had the right place to put a Powermatic would have bought that over my Jet 1 ½ HP 1642.

My lathe could handle occasional green wood coring operations. I harvest my own wood for turning not every log is suitable for coring or worth the effort. Nor is every bowl turning blank you can buy.

-- Bill

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com