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Forum topic by thesoninlaw posted 11-23-2013 02:09 PM 785 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thesoninlaw

97 posts in 1252 days


11-23-2013 02:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m working on a cutting board for a client. I glued up strip of various species and it came out well—except that the roasted oak bonded very poorly with the adjacent strip of ash. The bond was poor enough that it broke (cleanly along the joint, with no loss of material on either side. This roasted oak (comes out awesomely black when oiled) had previously glued very well to oak and maple, and the ash, well I have had no problem gluing that before either. I’m using Titebond III. Any suggestions?


10 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#1 posted 11-23-2013 02:23 PM

If those were two particularly hard woods, and you clamped really tightly, maybe there just wasn’t enough glue left in the joint?

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#2 posted 11-23-2013 03:00 PM

The glue sets a lot slower in cold weather as well.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#3 posted 11-23-2013 03:15 PM

Perhaps you used some old glue. I’m not familiar with “Roasted Oak” is this a particular species or is it a treatment oak has been through? If your RO is an Oliy wood you could wipe it down with some acetone before you reglue. you could also try to rough up the gluing edges with some 60 grit .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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thesoninlaw

97 posts in 1252 days


#4 posted 11-23-2013 03:30 PM

It is a treatment the oak has been through. It is just what it sounds like—the oak is heated just shy of actual combustion. It is used to hang in wine tanks so color and flavor the wine. I have access to actual mountains of this stuff after it has been removed from the tanks ( I work in the biggest winery in the world). It is however about 3/8×4 x 48 inches and mixed in with other slats of unroasted oak soaked in (and colored by) various wines. I have only recently begun to experiment with this stuff (which I absolutely have to, considering the cost—free—and availability). The only stipulation in getting this wood is that I not sell it. I believe I will try both using acetone and sizing today and get back.

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#5 posted 11-23-2013 03:56 PM

Thanks for the info. I know when you have a burned edge on wood it does not hold up very well when glued.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2022 posts in 1636 days


#6 posted 11-23-2013 04:08 PM

It isn,t the most beautiful way, but try PU glue. I had problems with glueing beech who was treated against combustibility with an atic. PVA glue wasn,t possible but with PU it was OK.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3115 days


#7 posted 11-23-2013 04:32 PM

The gluing problems don’t surprise me. I’ve read a bit about the
process and believe it sort of seals the microscopic pores in the
wood. Wood is normally hydroscopic too, so it draws the glue
into it. This roasted oak may not be doing that.

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

387 posts in 3049 days


#8 posted 11-23-2013 04:34 PM

Here’s a thought… Could it be that the RO is so dry that it soaks up the water in the glue before the glue has a chance to set? I had the same problem with the leaf of a table a friend wanted re-glued. It was about 50-60 years old. The first time I tried, the joint failed, right on the glue line. I ran the boards through my jointer, taking off the old glue and then dampened both edges, not soaking, put the glue on and clamped it up. That was about 4 years ago, he says it is still together.

Just my two

-- Rick

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#9 posted 11-23-2013 04:45 PM

You might just have to router a spline in the middle or use some dowels or domino it if you have the tool for it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View thesoninlaw's profile

thesoninlaw

97 posts in 1252 days


#10 posted 11-24-2013 12:58 PM

Well, I ripped off about 1/32” off both pieces and sized the roasted oak and glued them back up—it’s holding just fine. I think the first time the RO just soaked up the glue before it could set. Thanks everybody.

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