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What percentage of moisture is exceptible for resawing small 1/2 logs

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Forum topic by Jon Anderson posted 11-21-2013 08:12 PM 1152 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jon Anderson

26 posts in 1793 days


11-21-2013 08:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question zebrawood maple bandsaw milling

They are spalted maple , waterwood and alligator wood and zebra wood. Does anyone know if you need different maximum moisture content for different wood. These are all been waxes for the last year but some of them are holding moisture up to 25%, some at around 13 and one at 8

-- jbander


9 replies so far

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#1 posted 11-22-2013 02:45 AM

If you do re-saw them, you better sticker them ASAP with a lot of weight because there will be a lot of stress from uneven drying, and your wood may not dry straight and flat. Re-sawing from partially dried cants is tricky.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#2 posted 11-22-2013 03:29 AM

Danny, does that mean it is best to resaw wood as soon as it is cut? I cut some red maple and oak this fall and thought of trying my hand at resawing some of the smaller pieces, only 10” in diameter, just to see how it works. I figured I would wait until it dried over the winter. Perhaps not.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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Jon Anderson

26 posts in 1793 days


#3 posted 11-22-2013 06:55 AM

Ok these pieces are going to be resawed to use directly in designs that I’m working on. I don’t have to glue them in place I can keep them floating . The question is how dry, percentage wise does it have to be to resaw and use the product Immediately. Warping would not be acceptable.

-- jbander

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#4 posted 11-22-2013 12:34 PM

lightcs1776,

It is always better to saw to the desired finished rough dimensions (i.e. 1” thick for planing later to 3/4” final thickness) from the green log. Thick lumber, like a cant, is very hard to dry because the outside dries much faster than the inside setting up stress. This stress is released by the wood cracking and splitting, or, it can be released when you re-saw it. I would go ahead a re-saw the maple and oak now and put the lumber on stickers.

Jon,

The answer to your question depends on use. If the pieces are to be used individually and not glued (glued as in a panel or tabletop), you can get away with higher moisture content. The issues is that the wood once re-sawn will continue to dry and shrink. I would think that less than 12 – 15% moisture content would be desirable. That is the same moisture as air dried lumber, and I have used air dried lumber successfully in many projects.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#5 posted 11-22-2013 01:20 PM

Danny, thanks for the explanation.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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Nomad62

726 posts in 2419 days


#6 posted 11-22-2013 04:30 PM

It needs to be as dry as it will get in its end environment to rely on its staying in final shape. Some woods will dry slower that others, often depending on their density. If a person relies on air drying, it is best to allow it to set until the moisture content remains the same for a month or so; variables abound. I’ve dealt with tons (literally) of spalted maple, but none of the other woods you list; the maple tends to move as it dries, getting lumpy surfaces and such as it does. Movement is almost always related to moisture change, without a kiln or other means of speeding up a controllable drying process it will take patience. 12-15% is a good number to shoot for, as WDHTL15 stated.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Jon Anderson's profile

Jon Anderson

26 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 11-22-2013 05:13 PM

These are smaller pieces that I’ve purchased in the past to make sure they are dry, they are all waxed, some of it comes dry , some of it is still holds quite a bit of moisture. I’ve found that even though the wood measure a acceptable number when it is measured for moisture content ,it still can be quite moist inside when it is re-sawed. I have been Microwaving the pieces that have been found to have to much moisture after it has been re-sawed but that can be tricky.

-- jbander

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Nomad62

726 posts in 2419 days


#8 posted 11-22-2013 06:58 PM

That happens quite often; getting wood dry is easier said than done, and it is relatively costly to get wood from 12% down to 8% where many people like to see it. My maple goes from 30% to 12% in a couple weeks, but will take 2-3 weeks to get the last few percentage points. Many kiln operators put wood in their heated box and call it kiln dried, and they can because there is no absolute standard to go by. They may heat the wood, maybe dry it some, but that won’t get it dry thru and thru. The surface may read 12- 15%, while the center is still 25-30%. Very misleading. A kiln load, or “charge”, is dried by average, that meaning the average for the whole charge is what the wood is deemed; if the kiln is poorly loaded or has poor air flow, it may have wood at varying percentages yet the average is applied to it all. When working with particular projects a person needs to ensure the woods condition themselves or be able to rely on their kiln operator to do a good job. This is why I often recommend cutting wood thicker than needed, then letting it acclimate before final machining.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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Jon Anderson

26 posts in 1793 days


#9 posted 11-27-2013 05:43 AM

I’ve re-sawed the pieces that I think I can us this year. To 3/8” some less and re wrapped them in plastic and will use as needed. The pieces were all 13% and less and the inside is higher as you people pointed out. They’ll have a few more weeks then anything that I want to use that has to high a moisture content I’ll microwave, Otherwise ill have to frame with wider containment pieces then I want . It is amazing how quickly they shrink in the microwave, I’ve found that to microwaved them you have to be real careful and do it very slow.

-- jbander

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