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What kind of joint is this?

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Forum topic by ColonelTravis posted 11-21-2013 12:20 AM 1886 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ColonelTravis

653 posts in 612 days


11-21-2013 12:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: circle joint

Saw this unusual way to make drawers in an oak chest from the 1880s-1890s. Never seen it before, but from me that’s not saying much. Was this done by hand or fancy Industrial Revolution machine?


22 replies so far

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richardwootton

1407 posts in 674 days


#1 posted 11-21-2013 12:26 AM

I wonder if the face is mortised or dadoed into the sides…

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 757 days


#2 posted 11-21-2013 12:33 AM

Pin and Cove. It was one of the first machine-cut joinery systems. Invented by C.B. Knapp in the 1860’s or 1870’s.

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richardwootton

1407 posts in 674 days


#3 posted 11-21-2013 12:40 AM

And there’s Joe with the grand slam . . .

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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OldRick

72 posts in 412 days


#4 posted 11-21-2013 12:44 AM

Wow Joe. Sounds like you didn’t even bat an eye. I’ve never seen that joint and I frequent antique furniture places.

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ColonelTravis

653 posts in 612 days


#5 posted 11-21-2013 12:54 AM

Walking talking joint encyclopedia – thanks Joe.

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Loren

7808 posts in 2366 days


#6 posted 11-21-2013 01:07 AM

I’ve seen it a couple of times on mediocre old pieces. There are
some old ads for the machine (sometimes foot powered)
on OWWM.com

I think it was in use until the 1920s at least. It still is in
use of course here and there.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1626 days


#7 posted 11-21-2013 01:29 AM

There are so many people on here that know so much…........

Just amazing.

Truly.
==========================
As or me…........

I can count to 100 with my 5 year old grandson, and sing the alphabet song with my granddaughter

Other than that, my two Masters Degrees aren’t of much use any more.

And besides that, those two things are more valuable to me than Found Money.

-- We must all walk our own green mile

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pintodeluxe

3513 posts in 1532 days


#8 posted 11-21-2013 02:01 AM

It looks neat, but lacks the inherent strength in dovetails. I guess that’s why they pinned the joints.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Rick M.

4319 posts in 1098 days


#9 posted 11-21-2013 02:09 AM

Dovetails aren’t particularly strong but are a mechanical joint and do not rely on glue (in theory).

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Loren

7808 posts in 2366 days


#10 posted 11-21-2013 03:00 AM

The pins are integral, not added later. It looks
fussy compared to blind dovetailing, but perhaps
it worked better at the slow speeds of machinery
of the 19th century. I don’t imagine it was an
aesthetic selling point for furniture, but consider
that drawers ran on wood runners and pulling out
drawers in the day caused a lot of strain on the
front joints over time. Perhaps the pin and crescent
joints remained tighter over time or perhaps they
were just an industrial age fascination. Dovetail
joinery was not considered aesthetically appealing
until the 20th century when unskilled people began
to marvel at how hard they must be to cut (they
aren’t, but people who haven’t tried don’t get that).

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View GeneL's profile

GeneL

15 posts in 1691 days


#11 posted 11-21-2013 03:09 AM

Our bedroom furniture has these joints. It’s from my wife’s family, no one knows how old it is. But I have often been fascinated by these joints.

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ColonelTravis

653 posts in 612 days


#12 posted 11-21-2013 03:49 AM

If anyone’s interested, found a picture of the machine made it.

And a little more info. on it here.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1767 days


#13 posted 11-25-2013 06:35 PM

I saw some dove tail machine which offer an optional comb to make similar joints.
I personally like this joint, I believe that it is very pretty.

-- Bert

View Tmtoolman's profile

Tmtoolman

40 posts in 389 days


#14 posted 03-30-2014 06:28 AM

This came from my wife’s family in Toronto. I just haven’t had time to look up any information yet. Thanks for sharing the info. My wife calls this a washstand.

Washstand 2 photo IMG_20140314_131031_176.jpg

Washstand 4 photo IMG_20140314_131113_049.jpg

-- Turning fine wood into sawdust !

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Tmtoolman

40 posts in 389 days


#15 posted 03-30-2014 06:34 AM

delete

-- Turning fine wood into sawdust !

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