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Forum topic by Pezking7p posted 11-20-2013 02:36 AM 650 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pezking7p

1483 posts in 396 days


11-20-2013 02:36 AM

Second thread and two dumb questions so far…

I was using my stacked dado to hog out some material tonight, and discovered it cuts grooves at each edge of the cut. When I was done with my hogging, there were grooves cut across the bottom of my lap joint. After inspecting the blades, I discovered that every other tooth is angled up to the outside of the blade, and these teeth are leaving the grooves, which are 1/32 or maybe slightly deeper.

Is this normal? Did I put the stack together wrong? It’s my first time ever using a stacked dado, and it’s a CMT.

-- -Dan


11 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1784 posts in 465 days


#1 posted 11-20-2013 02:45 AM

This is normal, my Freud set does the same. The side cutters do so to score the edge of the cut to reduce tearout. Don’t try to use the chippers alone to keep this from happening, it doesn’t work out well!

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Pezking7p

1483 posts in 396 days


#2 posted 11-20-2013 02:48 AM

Thank you so much. I was worried I messed something up :)

-- -Dan

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MrFid

568 posts in 649 days


#3 posted 11-20-2013 03:10 AM

Well said by yeti. If you want to avoid them ( I call them batman ears), cut your dado a little shy then take out the correct depth with a router plane. Honestly this will only be necessary for museum quality pieces in my opinion. They aren’t very noticeable after a glue up and they actually provide a tiny bit of a relief for glue during the joining process. I too have a Freud and would say their depth is about 1/32 with mine also. If you want to avoid them without a router plane or chisel work, box joint blades don’t make them I think (don’t own one of those though so I can’t say for sure). Good luck and welcome to the site!

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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pintodeluxe

3551 posts in 1558 days


#4 posted 11-20-2013 06:02 AM

The only way I know to cut cleaner dados and tenons is to cut them in one pass.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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knotscott

5601 posts in 2120 days


#5 posted 11-20-2013 10:08 AM

The beveled teeth on the outside cutters that cause the grooves are purposely ground slightly taller than the flat teeth to help reduce splintering on cross grain cuts. Every dado set I know has them, but some of the better ones minimize the effect.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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MrRon

2975 posts in 1988 days


#6 posted 11-20-2013 05:47 PM

As shown by Knotscotts sketch, the depth of the dado will be measured at the chipper tooth, not the outer blade teeth.

View bowedcurly's profile

bowedcurly

499 posts in 474 days


#7 posted 11-20-2013 06:17 PM

godzilla ears is what I call them use a box joint cutter for flat flat flat flat jado’s

-- Staining killed the wood<<<<<>>>>>Dyeing gave it life

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Richard

1099 posts in 1435 days


#8 posted 11-20-2013 06:27 PM

So where do we get box Joint blades to fit our dado stack ?

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pintodeluxe

3551 posts in 1558 days


#9 posted 11-20-2013 07:04 PM

A box joint cutter is a type of dado blade with flat top outer blades. They come as a kit just like other dado sets.
They will make flat dados, but will sacrifice surface cut quality when cross-cutting plywood.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1793 days


#10 posted 11-20-2013 08:24 PM

They also help clean the corners in the dado, to have a sharp corner instead of a rounded one.

-- Bert

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2120 days


#11 posted 11-20-2013 08:28 PM

”A box joint cutter is a type of dado blade with flat top outer blades. They come as a kit just like other dado sets. They will make flat dados, but will sacrifice surface cut quality when cross-cutting plywood.”

That’s a an important point that pertains to cross grain cuts in lumber as well. Box joints are generally cut with the grain. Stacked dado sets and box joint sets each have their strengths and weaknesses.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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