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What strength tea have you used to darken maple?

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 11-18-2013 07:10 PM 837 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


11-18-2013 07:10 PM

We tried four bags to a long cup of water and the results looked good until the moisture dried. It was pretty light by then.

What’s your ratio of bags to water to get a medium tone, warmth more than color, a slightly aged look?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


7 replies so far

View jordanp's profile

jordanp

1086 posts in 1407 days


#1 posted 11-18-2013 07:23 PM

Don’t have much experience with using Tea.

Get you a scrap piece and try Coffee grounds (hot/damp) rub it in with a rag and see what you think..

-- J. Palmer Woodworks - Rockwall TX -I woke up this morning thinking “man, I really hope someone posted some soul scarring sh*t on LJs today.” -- - Billy

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


#2 posted 11-18-2013 07:26 PM

The coffee faded as well. I think the tannin in the tea is what we want. Thanks for the thoughts.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#3 posted 11-18-2013 08:03 PM

Maybe the tannin in the tea in conjunction with iron dissolved in vinegar. Just speculating, I have no first hand knowledge of this although I have experimented w/ steel wool dissolved in vinegar on quite a few different woods, but not maple. and never w/ tea. Might be worth experimenting on some scrap.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ROB_IN_MN's profile

ROB_IN_MN

30 posts in 1613 days


#4 posted 11-18-2013 08:55 PM

you could try using India Ink. I’ve done this before with both maple and oak. You can get it downright black doing this – my application was ebonizing and it worked great for that.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1539 days


#5 posted 11-18-2013 09:07 PM

I use (lifetime wood treatment) from valhalco.com It is a bath of acids and other minerals and stuff. Here is a pic of two soaking by brush, not quite dry yet. Currently using it on an oak project I will post. If slightly aged is what you are going for, I have brushed on, wiped dry immediately and then set in full sun to dry. Don’t know if it goes the right way, but it goes in the silvery look of aged. don’t know if that is the direction you are going but just thought I would share. Gets quite dark on oak. Darkens when under clear coat. If you like tea, try it.. you might like it.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


#6 posted 11-18-2013 09:53 PM

Reading these well intentioned responses, I realized I had left out two important details in my OP: First, by “slightly aged” I mean inside the house. The kitchen. Like, say, for instance, a cutting board. Which is what they are. They being the operative word here. Read on.

Second, there are 175 of them. We’re looking for efficient and inexpensive, not a lovingly hand-applied, master blended concoction on a boutique masterpiece.

Can we go around again?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1539 days


#7 posted 11-18-2013 11:19 PM

The solution I proposed is very easy to apply. Can actually be done with a simple garden pump sprayer, and doesn’t need much “love” However. I don’t think it is food safe, and I think you are going in a “golden” direction, not the silverish direction. May I suggest two things. Make a bigger batch and reduce it down, to make a concentrate. Second. It can be hard to get hard maple to absorb stains of any kind. Don’t know the solution to that, but answering, “how to get the maple to drink up more tea?” is the direction to go in. I think a concentrate of some kind might make it through the testing phase.

-- Who is John Galt?

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