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Need help with removable lid design

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Forum topic by shopguy2 posted 11-18-2013 03:56 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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shopguy2

3 posts in 1118 days


11-18-2013 03:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oval box oval box lid shaping

I want to build a box like the one in this picture, about 6”x9” oval, maybe 2 to 3” tall.

I’ve build similar boxes using my band-saw, bench sander, and router with bowl cutting bit—but I’m not sure how to do this type of lid, or even what it is called to search online for ideas (i.e.-inlaid, sliding, etc). I want to make it all from one solid piece, probably maple or walnut, maybe other types later.

My main concern is how to get the top, the inside (bevel?) to fit well in the box. In the past I’ve created a template out of clear plastic (plexi-glass?) to hollow out the inside with my bowl cutting bit… maybe a way that template could help for the top?

I’ve seen other people make tops like this out of 2 pieces, but I’m hoping to find a way to keep it one solid piece of wood—if safe/practical method for doing so.

Being able to build several about the same (want to try with a few types of wood) would be an added bonus, but not 100% required. I’m not that great at “free hand” stuff, so I usually prefer to build jigs/templates when I can, especially for oval objects like this one.

First time here, sorry if posted in wrong forum, and thanks for providing this great website with lots of ideas and info.

-Eric


9 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 11-18-2013 04:27 PM

You can use an Ellipse jig.

http://www.amazon.com/Rockler-Ellipse-Circle-Router-Jig/dp/B001DT4TSG/ref=pd_sxp_f_pt

Not necessarily that one, since it’s expensive, but you can make one simple enough. Archimedes trammel connected to a router plate.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8261 posts in 2895 days


#2 posted 11-18-2013 04:49 PM

Make or buy a 1/4” thick MDF template to hollow out the oval from your solid block. Then, slice off the top of the solid block at the band saw. Make sure it’s thick enough for the lid insert/retainer. Attach the template with double stick tape. Go to the drill press and use forstner bit to waste away most of the oval cavity. Use a router bit extension and a bowl bit to finish hollowing it out. Temporarily (double stick tape, hot melt glue) reattach the lid piece and cut the oval shape at the band saw, insuring equal wall thickness all around.
To make the lid insert/retainer, chuck in a suitable bit (plunge style straight bit) in the router table and adjust it for the depth you want and adjust the fence for the thickness of the oval’s walls. If possible, bury the bit in a virgin fence insert so you have zero clearance around the bit. For safety, temporarily attach a “handle” to the top of the lid to keep your fingers away from the bit. Because the lid’s outside edge will determine the contour of the insert/retainer is why the wall thickness must be uniform. Some of your purchased templates will have several cut outs at a predetermined distance away from the oval cut out. If you make your own, drill some holes around the cavity and use them to mark for the wall thickness. Or, simply use a compass and ride the metal point on the inside of the cavity.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#3 posted 11-18-2013 04:52 PM

Another idea could be to make an oval template out of 1/4” MDF or ply, and use bushings. Use a bushing very close to the bit for the outer edges, and use a larger bushing and reduce the depth for the inner face.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#4 posted 11-18-2013 05:26 PM

If you don’t mind a perfect oval shape, just place two piece of nails on a board, tie a string between the two allowing a few inches of slack. Use a pencil by placing it inside the string and draw your oval.

The only way I can think of making the lip for the lid is either cut a piece and glue it on or use a jig tog wrap and glue several veneer pieces to it; you can make adjustments by adding, sanding the layers.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

875 posts in 1751 days


#5 posted 11-18-2013 06:39 PM

+1 to Gene’s post

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View shopguy2's profile

shopguy2

3 posts in 1118 days


#6 posted 11-19-2013 05:56 AM

Thanks for all the info, I’ll have to read these a couple more times, but most of this makes sense and I’m sure the rest will be clear when it isn’t so late at night.

Is there a standard name for this type of lid? I know it isn’t inlaid… I guess outlaid, if that is a word.

I like what Gene said, I think if I could get the wall thickness even all around, that would make the lid a lot easier, since then it is just a matter of taking off some set amount from all around—and that I’ve done before. Never thought about purchasing templates, that might be a big help—or making/buying a tool like jmartel posted.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8261 posts in 2895 days


#7 posted 11-19-2013 02:15 PM

Shopguy2,
Either way you go, the walls need to be pretty consistent. Only way around that would be to make a template for the inset on the lid that would exactly match the contour of the interior wall and use that in the manner jmartel suggests. IMHO, making the walls evenly thick would be easier.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View shopguy2's profile

shopguy2

3 posts in 1118 days


#8 posted 11-20-2013 03:08 PM

I agree Gene, and plan on trying that this weekend. In the future I might want to make something with variable width walls, such as this: http://www.woodworking.com/ww/Article/Keepsake_Box_7412.aspx—but I’d still probably make it from a solid piece, so couldn’t follow his design, just the look/walls.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2532 days


#9 posted 11-20-2013 08:13 PM

Use the bottom as a template for the solid piece for the top? Then cut it out and shape it. Cut the rabbet with a bearing guided router bit that cuts the same depth as the bottom walls. Do the final sanding with the top and bottom put together to make sure that they are exactly the same shape.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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