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Best bandsaw blade for cutting tenons?

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Forum topic by darthford posted 248 days ago 611 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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darthford

532 posts in 519 days


248 days ago

I was watching Norm cut tenons on his bandsaw in this video which seemed like a good way to go. He’s using a 1” blade and I did some research on Timberwolf’s website but they seem to suggest a smaller blade with more TPI for tenons. But if you think about this in terms of ripping or re-sawing kiln dried wood in this thickness they seem to recommend a 3-4 TPI hook blade. Just wondering if anyone has a suggestion on which blade would work best here for tenons 2”-6”? My saw accepts up to 1 1/4 ” blades.

New Yankee Workshop - Mission Bench


5 replies so far

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DeltaDaddy

52 posts in 249 days


#1 posted 248 days ago

I would think with that new table saw you’re getting and a tennoning jig would be the most accurate way to go

-- Take it apart to see how it works

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Loren

7222 posts in 2243 days


#2 posted 248 days ago

Any blade 1/4” and over will work okay for tenons as long as
it is sharp and not too many tpi. Sharpness helps the blade
track evenly in the cut. Anything 6tpi or lower will work
okay. The band saw is a good way to cut tenon cheeks
because (this is my observation) they come out a little rough
and that helps in getting a snug fit because the uneven
fibers have a little room to compress into the saw marks.
Thus a tenon that would be too tight cut on the table saw
can be worried into a mortise and withdrawn and it will
go in easier the next time.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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darthford

532 posts in 519 days


#3 posted 248 days ago

DeltaDaddy – Yep I have the Grizzly table saw tennoning jig sitting on a shelf at the ready but for cutting tenons on a 4’-6’ long board I think the bandsaw is the way to go. I tell you though Norm made it look so easy I’d be half tempted to just use the bandsaw for everything. On the other hand I was looking at the Wixley DRO for the table saw, we’ll see how accurate it is. I was a CNC machinist when I was younger so my brain is wired in decimal. If that DRO is accurate and reliable I could see that being quite useful on tenons.

Loren – I have a Timberwolf 3/8 4 TPI POS Claw already, and now a 1” 3 TPI POS Claw inbound. Guess I’ll make some test cuts. Any thoughts on the carbide tipped blade? Its variable TIP, I’m a carbide fan having come from metal working. At $200 a blade I’m going to practice a bit with the cheaper blades though.

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Loren

7222 posts in 2243 days


#4 posted 248 days ago

Band saws vary a lot in how they are built and how straight
the blade runs. Factors include how the tires are crowned
(mine are flat), how the guides are set up and whether
you’re exceeding the blade capacity the guides are designed
for. The blade can fishtail, bow in the cut, or lead. Leading
is the easiest to explain, diagnose and correct. Carbide blades
tend to cut pretty straight as long as the tire crown and
blade guides aren’t incompatible with the width of the blade.

I solder up my own carbon steel blades now. I have a 3”
wide carbide blade on my Hitachi resaw, but considering
the price of one of those blades, what I’ve observed of
carbide tip band saw blade longevity, and the price of a 100’
coil of 1” wide carbon steel resaw stock from Laguna,
I think soldering up blades is the most economical option.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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DeltaDaddy

52 posts in 249 days


#5 posted 248 days ago

Yeah I guess long boards may get a little sketchy standing up on the table saw. I just had a conversation with a guy a couple weeks ago who fixes metalworking machines. He made shoulder cuts for raised panel rails on a Bridgeport so clearly there are no rules lol.

-- Take it apart to see how it works

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