LumberJocks

What is the best way to cut this out

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Rob posted 11-14-2013 11:29 PM 1145 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


11-14-2013 11:29 PM

I have a dilemma and I’m not sure how to go about making this cut. I bought a new 27 foot camper and it has an opening in a section of the wall that is 28.5” in diameter. I want to get a 32” (diagonal) HDTV and most of them measure just under 32” in actual width when factoring in the bezel. As with most campers, the “wood” wall with the recess for the TV is really particle board with a fake wood laminate (think any cheap knock down furniture sold at a box store). I have room on the left side of the opening to cut out enough of the particle board to accommodate a 32” TV but what is the best way to go about it without getting into a full remodel of that wall. Here’s a drawing to show what I need to do. A circular saw using a plunge cut is out of the question because it’s too big to fit where I need to make the cut. I can’t use a router and a straight edge either for the same reason. I might be able to use my Jig Saw but I don’t know if I can successfully make a straight cut because for some reason when using my Jig Saw I can make the cut straight but it ends up being beveled and it would look terrible if that makes sense. Any ideas?


12 replies so far

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 1704 days


#1 posted 11-14-2013 11:40 PM

Can you get at it from the rear to allow more room for the circular saw or router? Or can you detach the wall to lay out on a bench or workhorse? I’m guessing not since you are asking this question.

The jigsaw idea should work fine if you can clamp down a guide rail and drill some start/stop holes. Otherwise, other tools like mini circular saws (the 3” blade kind… man i want one of those,) or a mini router like a bosch colt (super handy for most things) or the good old fashioned handsaw/hacksaw with a straight edge should get the job done.

How thick is the material?

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


#2 posted 11-14-2013 11:57 PM

The material is 3/4” thick. I can’t get at it from the rear because it’s a recess with about a 5” depth. Funny you mention the mini circular saws. I have been looking at those possible being the best solution or a mini router. Both solutions are a lot of money to make one cut so in order to buy either I have to determine which tool I would use the most and then figure out which one has the best reviews.

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 1704 days


#3 posted 11-15-2013 12:05 AM

Well, I dont have a mini circ saw (yet) but I picked up a mini router (trim router is the proper term) at Harbor Freight with a coupon for $20. I think they are $30 normally priced. I use the thing every chance I can since it’s much more comfortable to use than my full size Bosch. Wouldnt use it on thick hardwood, but through MDF or melamine, it cuts like butter.

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#4 posted 11-15-2013 12:09 AM

I would make that cut with a straight edge and oscillating tool (Fien saw, or Rockwell sonic crafter type thing) With a good sharp blade and some practice you can do it quite clean and very straight. We do this a lot with cabinets for post install modifications. IMO

-- Who is John Galt?

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


#5 posted 11-15-2013 12:10 AM

Would the trim router be a good tool for something like a juice groove in a cutting board? I seem to make a ton of cutting boards this time of year to give as gifts or sell to others to give as gifts.

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


#6 posted 11-15-2013 12:15 AM

I do have a Dremel Multi Max. Similar to what the Fein and Rockwell do. How do you use those with a straight edge?

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 1704 days


#7 posted 11-15-2013 12:44 AM

Yes the trim router can do the juice groove (nice term). I’ve used a bowl shaping bit, i think that’s what it’s called (only 1/4” bits) to do something like that. I had made a wooden scabbard for a sword using some oak. Ripped a piece of oak down the middle on my table saw, and cut a juice groove like, uh, groove, down the middle that was wide enough for the blade. Then glued the two pieces back together. I used the mini router for that and it worked fine. It was only 3/32” deep on each side but it worked great. At $30, that thing is invaluable. Much more use for me than the mini circ saw. I bet those are handy in the field if you are doing construction though… ripping plywood and such.

Curious to see how a dremel works with a straight guide. Theres a tool I havent used in my shop in a while. Hmm…..

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#8 posted 11-15-2013 06:14 PM

”How do you use those with a straight edge?” In your case I would use 3/4” ply and screw it to the panel. It is used as a guide to run the blade along. It can keep it square, and straight. Practice a few times, and you will see. I can post a photo as well

-- Who is John Galt?

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


#9 posted 11-15-2013 08:04 PM

Yes Joey. Would you post a picture so I can see exactly what you mean please.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#10 posted 11-15-2013 09:43 PM

Basically I use the face of the piece to help keep the blade square, and run it down the straight edge to keep the cut straight. In a material like old part. board in a trailer, it will cut like butter. I usually make a scoring cut the length of the straight edge, and then carefully complete the cut. I have done this a lot and it gets easier to do each time, I would practice a few times to see if this is going to work for you. I can get cuts square, and straighter than a jib saw, but most importantly as a plunge cut. Many times we also do a plunge cut with a circ saw first and then finish the cut with the ocsillating saw.

-- Who is John Galt?

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#11 posted 11-15-2013 10:14 PM

I think I would blank the opening in the wall and surface mount the TV. Flat screen TV’s mount from the back with machine screws. How do you plan to attach the TV to the wall? By surface mounting, you will lose no more than a few inches of space.

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2447 days


#12 posted 11-15-2013 10:32 PM

Thanks for the picture Joey. That looks easy enough. MrRon, unfortunately I can’t do what you suggest because the camper has a slide out and when closed is very close to the TV opening. Maybe an inch gap between the side of the slide out and the TV wall. As for how to mount the TV, I will use a wall mounting bracket. The TV I buy will have to be one of the super slim models that are on the market now so I make sure it stays within the 5” depth of the recess.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com