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Forum topic by John Cobb posted 11-13-2013 05:20 AM 807 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John Cobb

57 posts in 1125 days


11-13-2013 05:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane planer shaping question tip

I’m working on building my first wooden hand plane. I went with a high angle plane around 57 degrees as that seemed to be the angle most people were going with. I’m wondering if there are any other specifics that I should know before I begin. I would love your feedback!

-- John Cobb


7 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#1 posted 11-13-2013 05:43 AM

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/BuildingaKrenovSmoother.html

Derek Cohen excels at making excellent planes. Enjoy the journey and
welcome to LJ’s John!

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1997 days


#2 posted 11-13-2013 06:31 AM

Welcome to LJs, John.

The article waho6o9 mentions is very good (as are the rest of the articles on Derek Cohen’s website). Cohen mentions using 55° for an angle right at the beginning of the article. In case it wasn’t clear from the article, he’s in Australia and a lot of the hardwoods they have there are considerably more difficult to work with than what we have here in NA. So that angle would be entirely appropriate for his use. If you mostly work with NA hardwoods, you’d find 45° to be easier to use.

Lots of good information and examples here of wooden plane construction. We just finished a hand plane swap, and had a good discussions on construction issues in this thread: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/51482. The first post in that thread is a step-by-step guide to construction. Many others, use the search function.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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John Cobb

57 posts in 1125 days


#3 posted 11-13-2013 12:06 PM

Thank you guys I’ll be checking all of these sources out as I am a little fuzzy on some of the details of the construction process.

-- John Cobb

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

4786 posts in 1677 days


#4 posted 11-13-2013 01:43 PM

John, the construction really depends on what you are wanting to do with the plane. For instance, a 57 degree angle is great for a smoothing plane for figured hardwood, but not ideal for softwood and general all around use. As Mark mentions, for general use 45 or 50 degrees would be much better. If you can give a few more details about what kind of plane you are making (block, smoother, jack or jointer) &/or what you are wanting to use it for, then you will get better advice.

The resources above are really good to get you going and there is a lot of solid expertise on LJ to help you out. Derek, Mark, rhett, DonW and many others. Good luck and make sure to post some pics of your final product.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#5 posted 11-13-2013 02:09 PM

This is a great book if you can find a copy for a reasonable price.

http://www.amazon.com/Making-Mastering-Planes-David-Finck/dp/061527353X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1384351704&sr=8-1&keywords=making+hand+plane

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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John Cobb

57 posts in 1125 days


#6 posted 11-13-2013 03:22 PM

Thank you guys I’ll be checking all of these sources out as I am a little fuzzy on some of the details of the construction process. I am looking to make a smoothing plane as I already have some general usage planes.

-- John Cobb

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1360 days


#7 posted 11-14-2013 03:18 AM

Hey John, I’d like to make one myself and at first I was thinking – this is so over my head. But I went to a build-your-own-Krenov seminar at a show not too long ago and realized it wasn’t.

There’s a guy who did a 9-part video on how to make a jack plane that’s pretty insightful.

He also did a 2-parter for a Krenov.

Once you get the general idea, check out all the designs on LJ, there are some real beauties. I’m sure you’ll come up with something real nice on your own.

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