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Longworth Chucks

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Forum topic by moke posted 11-12-2013 05:47 PM 2710 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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moke

861 posts in 2237 days


11-12-2013 05:47 PM

Can anyone tell me about your success/failures with Longworth chucks? If I do get one, are there things I should be careful of? I am primarily doing segmented bowls.
Thanks
Mike


15 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#1 posted 11-12-2013 08:06 PM

Mike … My first one was home-made with six bolts/stoppers. It worked okay, but I did have a couple of bowls come off. Last spring, a CNC machinist that belongs to my turning club made a bunch out of heavy black plastic. He sold them to club members for $40, so I got one and love it. His are the 8-bolt configuration, pre-drilled for a 6-bolt face-plate.

Just keep the speed down. I never run my Longworth over 500rpm.

I also use the tail-stock as much as possible. I have a couple of live centers with ‘soft touch’ (no spur) ends on them so I can get the security of tail-stock support without damaging the bottom of the bowl.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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moke

861 posts in 2237 days


#2 posted 11-12-2013 08:36 PM

Gerry—
Can you tell me about the Soft touch end….I have used a dowel I turned both ends flat and drilled a center hole to fit the spur in….will this work?
Thanks for the help
Mike

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#3 posted 11-12-2013 10:27 PM

Yup … should be fine.

One of the live centers I have is a Delta 46-490 … it comes with three replaceable tips, including one with a 1-inch flat disk that is designed to wedge the workpiece between the headstock and the tailstock without marring it.

This is it: http://www.amazon.com/DELTA-46-490-Bearing-Center-Lathes/dp/B00004Z02E#productDetails

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1191 days


#4 posted 11-13-2013 12:50 AM

How’s this for a tenon removal aid. Tailstock pressure until you remove the form from the lathe. I had a donut chuck explode on me, and that’s the reason I invented this Live Center Steady. I have none on the market yet, but I have done over 40 forms so far, and lost only the first 2 not knowing how to use it…..... ...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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justinwdemoss

148 posts in 2356 days


#5 posted 11-13-2013 01:28 AM

I have a commercially produced 14 inch longworth. Got it last year in my stocking. I could have built one, but would rather spend the time turning instead of building the chuck. I use mine all the time. However, if you go that route, you should know that you can’t crank the bolts on the rubber jaws down too hard. I split the rubber stopper in half doing that.

If you want to build your own. Captain Eddie Castelin has plans and supplies on his website and a youtube video about it.

-- Justin in Loveland, OH

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#6 posted 11-13-2013 02:20 PM

I do not turn segmented bowls, so do not understand what you are trying to accomplish. Do not have the skills to make my own Longworth chuck, so never made one.

Do have several various size donut chucks that do not use much anymore. Biggest expense was threaded rod, bolts and washers. Old carpet or foam rubber prevent, marring. While have to play with alignment a bit probably safest method to reverse turn bowls.

These days just use a jam chuck, foam rubber, and tailstock support for reverse turning. Very old 3/8” spindle gouge ground with very point tip helps me turn base leaving a small nib that cut off and sand smooth.

-- Bill

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2237 days


#7 posted 11-13-2013 03:31 PM

All awesome Ideas….thanks to all of you to take the time to help me.

Justin—-I wish I had a lathe that would take a 14” chuck…my max is 12….heck I wish I had a stocking that would hold a 14” chuck!!!! And great idea on not cranking the bolts too tight….this is just what I wanted to learn…Thanks

Gerry—-I think I will fill my own stocking…with a 46-490! That looks like a great addition and I don’t need to loose my religion every time I go to use my “dowel” on a live center….as always, you have great advice…thanks

Bill—-thanks for the advice…the only real difference is that a segmented bowl is hollow in the center from the start. I mount mine to a face plate and turn the inside and sides first, then part it off a sacrificial bottom and use the Longworth to hold it to finish the base. I have some jaws for my one way or I could make a jam chuck, but I am always looking for a quicker easier way to do things…..oh, nice bowl by the way!!!...thanks

Jerry—I am impressed with your innovation….thanks for the input…but right now I have been making a vase style bowl and I dont think there is room for the wheels….nice lid too…thanks

Mike

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3046 days


#8 posted 11-13-2013 03:39 PM

Clever idea with the rollers if it works ok?
Anyway as far as longworth chucks are concerned it seems that preperation, and taking your time, re design and marking out, and cutting the parts ,,is paramount to it’s success . Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View rum's profile

rum

148 posts in 2046 days


#9 posted 11-13-2013 11:58 PM

I use a commercial longworth primarily for re-turning bottoms. The main gotcha is that you really need some significant “lip” on the bowl for it to grab ahold of (I’ve used it in both compression mode for “normal” looking bowls and expansion mode for bowls that lip in on the top) or you need to keep the tailstock on it for all turning1. I can generally get away with pulling the tailstock back for some light sanding even with pretty straight sided things.

I usually just use a small flat piece of scrap wood (say 1/4”x1/4”) to keep the pointy end of the tail stock from digging in if I need to. The soft end might arguably be better, but haven’t had a problem yet (disclaimer I do use pretty hard/tough wood for it, and it could split and come off so I don’t tighten it down to much. A piece of UHMW or similar would probably be a smarter choice).

Also do pay attention to tightening order, alternate sides like you would tightening a head gasket. I usually go around it three times to final tightness. I’ve split one of the rubber thingies as well, but I don’t think it was due to over tightening.. I got kinda close with a chisel once :| Not a good idea!

[1] I only pull the failstock back even on those for trimming off the final nub

Those rollers are kind of genius, nicely done.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#10 posted 11-14-2013 12:29 AM

Mike—If you do wind up buying the Delta live center, I would suggest putting a pad on the 1-inch flat disk.

I used a 1” felt furniture glide … the kind with adhesive on the back. Guaranteed not to leave any marks on your bowl.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View poospleasures's profile

poospleasures

544 posts in 1945 days


#11 posted 11-14-2013 01:04 AM

I have the Pennstate big jaw chuck which works on bowls up to 8” to chuck outside or a little bigger on the inside. As said by rum it makes a difference on the bowls taper in or out. The pins which come with these chucks are way to hard for my liking. At Lowes in their specialty hardware drawers you can find tapered rubber stoppers of various sizes. You can drill a hole (6mm I think) thru then and use threaded bolts to tighten them down and make them bulge out against the bowl rim and they hold really good. For larger bowls I use a larger piece of 3/4” plywood cut in about 12 to 14” circle with a glue block about 2 1/2” on the back. Turn it flat and round then use a trammel or compass to draw circles at about every 1/4” from about midway to the outside now draw 8 lines from the center spaced equally. Set your bowl until it centers in one of circles and use screws with small washer heads at the 8 points around the bowl rim. Tighten in the headgasket sequence until they bulge and hold you bowl tightly. I do lightly use the tail stock for a little security until I am down to a small nubbin which I hand chisel off then sand to finish. With any of these jigs do use a slow speed. I’ve done probably 20 or more bowls with my homemade circle and have not lost one yet

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2237 days


#12 posted 11-14-2013 06:10 PM

Thank you guys…
Gerry that is a great idea to soften the center even more

Rum—
Thanks for the advice on the “lip” of the bowl….

Vhuffines—
good fix by lowes—-I’ll pick some of those up. On your plywood chuck…do you use the stoppers you drill out then?

Mike

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poospleasures

544 posts in 1945 days


#13 posted 11-16-2013 12:45 AM

Yes I bought 2 sets and drilled the holes a bit smaller to use with the smaller dia. wood screws into the plywood.

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

View lew's profile

lew

11335 posts in 3216 days


#14 posted 11-16-2013 04:29 AM

My homemade one works fine. I use nylon reinforced packing tape to make sure any questionable piece is held in place.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2237 days


#15 posted 11-16-2013 03:39 PM

lew…that is a great idea with the packing tape!! Thanks to one and all for your help…
Mike

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