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Question about Jojoba oil

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Forum topic by bobasaurus posted 11-11-2013 06:25 PM 2950 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bobasaurus

2665 posts in 2646 days


11-11-2013 06:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jojoba

I recently bought some Jojoba oil from Lie-Nielsen to prevent rust on my planes, chisels, and the like. I tried it on a few tools in my shop that night and then went to sleep. The next morning, I noticed the oil bottle had frozen into a solid congealed mass and there were snowflake-like crystals on the surface of all tools that I wiped the oil on. The temperature only dropped to maybe 40 degrees F overnight… not even a full freeze. The oil eventually thawed and I re-wiped the tools to get rid of the snowflake-like patterns, but I’m wondering if this will be a problem in my cold garage shop during the winter. If the oil (really a type of liquid wax in this case) on my tools freezes, will the rust-prevention qualities remain the same? If not, should I be using a different rust prevention product that can stand up to the cold better? I’ve been using Johnson’s paste wax before this, but still had minor rust problems occasionally with fingerprints or areas that wear off in use.

-- Allen, Colorado


5 replies so far

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


#1 posted 11-11-2013 06:31 PM

No rust prevention is perfect regarding WW tools. I have tried about all of them. I live in humid FL and paste wax has proven to be the most cost effective for me.
Sure wax wears off and so did all of the other products. It was in small spots and easily taken care of.

-- Jerry

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Tim

3113 posts in 1424 days


#2 posted 11-11-2013 06:58 PM

Just random speculation, but it seems like if the Jojoba oil is meant to be protective as a liquid, then there is a good chance that when it “freezes” and solid wax crystals are formed it might not protect as well. That melting and freezing just seems like a chance for water vapor to work it’s way in there. There’s definitely nothing wrong with the stuff in the bottle though, as soon as the crystals are warmed enough to melt, it’s the same thing as before.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4026 posts in 1813 days


#3 posted 11-11-2013 09:20 PM

I’ve not had that problem in my cold shop. I don’t store the oil out there though, I just keep a cloth saturated with it in a baggie near my plane till for wipe downs. I rejuvenate the shop rag periodically w/ oil that is stored in the house. I’ve never had crystals form on the tools.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1698 days


#4 posted 11-12-2013 12:53 AM

I use jojoba oil for a couple reasons. Number 1 it’s non toxic and is one of the best natural moisturizers. So after a day in the shop it will repair your beat up hands overnight. Number 2 it works pretty well. Jojoba oil is a wax not an oil and has a low melting temp. The prevention properties should remain the same. I use an unheated garage and I use it regardless of season here in New England. If you think you’re going to use it put it in your pocket for a few mins and that will liquify it. As jerry mentioned no rust prevention system is perfect. I’ve used it with success and have no complaints. If your tools are cold and you need to apply some, bring the tool inside if it’s a hand tool. If it’s a machine surface I’ve seen people use a hair dryer to warm use the cast iron so that when it’s applied it doesn’t harden. Another product to look into is CRC 3-36. Just my 2 cents.
L

View mchuray's profile

mchuray

81 posts in 2460 days


#5 posted 11-12-2013 12:53 AM

Interestingly enough FWW recently did testing on rust preventives and good ole WD-40 was right up there as one of the top rated rust preventives. To me it and Johnson’s past wax are what I use for my tools. Both are cost effective and available everywhere, at least in the U.S. Don’t use it on my guns though. As I live in hot and always humid Louisiana, I find these are the best options. I tried T-8 and others and I’ll stick with those two.
Mark

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