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Wedge shaped bread board end

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Forum topic by cdyrssen posted 289 days ago 741 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cdyrssen

5 posts in 291 days


289 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: bread board design desk wood movement inlay

Hello everyone. My name is Christoffer Dyrssen and this is my first post on the forum. I am fairly new to woodworking but have been doing a bunch of research on the topic and have recently decided to take on the project of making myself a desk. I just had a question about this breadboard end that came up during a google search. It has the breadboard wedged into the top panel with a shallow angle. I know that this will be problematic due to wood movement. My question comes in here. I was wondering if I would still have problems if, instead of making the entire bread board end wedged between the top panel I made like a half lap kind of overlay from the bread board and created a groove for it to rest inside of the actual top. Maybe a better way to describe my idea would be to make a normal bread board, but have a thin overhang shaped like a wedge on the show side that is inlayed into the top. I hope that I am describing this alright. I can come up with a drawing if you have problems understanding what I am trying to explain. Just was wondering if this would solve the problem or would it still be a problem.


11 replies so far

View LakeLover's profile

LakeLover

275 posts in 571 days


#1 posted 289 days ago

Maybe a better way to describe my idea would be to make a normal bread board, but have a thin overhang shaped like a wedge on the show side that is inlayed into the top. I hope that I am describing this alright. I can come up with a drawing if you have problems understanding what I am trying to explain.

I am a bit confused a cross section drawing would help.

That would be a nice looking top if you can pull it off.

Have you considered veneer over ply and not worry about wood movement ?

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cdyrssen

5 posts in 291 days


#2 posted 289 days ago

To get the thickness I wanted for the top I ended up having to use 5/4 solid wood, so unfortunately that was not an ideal method. I will try and get a drawing up to give you a visual description of my thoughts.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3334 posts in 1445 days


#3 posted 289 days ago

Even standard breadboard ends are tricky and problematic. I would save yourself the heartache and start with a regular breadboard. After the joinery is cut, you could taper the outside edge of the breadboard end for a similar look.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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cdyrssen

5 posts in 291 days


#4 posted 289 days ago

I had thought of that as well. That is kind of my plan b right now if it is going to be too impractical to make this design.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3334 posts in 1445 days


#5 posted 289 days ago

The problem is a large table will move 3/8” – 1/2” across its width seasonally. So the wood will create a gap at the outer breadboard joint. Whatever means you use to attach the end to the table will be stressed and could fail.

Best of luck with whatever method you choose.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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pintodeluxe

3334 posts in 1445 days


#6 posted 289 days ago

It looks pretty striking with an external taper.

Another option is to reverse the external taper, so the chevron points to the center of the table. I don’t care for the look of this one as much.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

361 posts in 574 days


#7 posted 289 days ago

An external “out” taper looks nice. I think it would be easier to create.

The internal, “chevron” looks difficult. You could make the chevron cut using a pattern and a pattern bit on a router.

BJ

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

657 posts in 305 days


#8 posted 289 days ago

Chris,
I like to see people challenge the old mouse trap. Quarter sawn timber will help and keep it small.

The mitered bb in the pix….550mm or 21 1/2 in. It’s about 10 years old. Bunya Pine. If I get a lot of
movement I’m calling it antique.

-- Bill....... I listen very closely to the timber and then impose my will.

View cdyrssen's profile

cdyrssen

5 posts in 291 days


#9 posted 289 days ago

Here is a drawing of what I was thinking. My drafting skills are not the greatest so I hope it is clear enough to get the idea. None of it is really drawn to scale. I was planning on using oversized mortises in the bread board with the middle tenon glued in. Would this need any othe sort of reinforcement? Would I need to dowel the mortises and tenons together?

Just a little more information on the project itself. It’s flat sawn poplar and is about 24 inches wide. I live in Midland, Texas, and it’s fairly dry here. I’m not sure what the average relative humidity change is though. Would that information be found at the weather channel website?

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pintodeluxe

3334 posts in 1445 days


#10 posted 289 days ago

That would work. Just expect some gaps at the joint seasonally. Not that big of a problem for a desk. On dining tables food gets in the cracks, but on a desk it should be okay.
I usually leave my breadboard ends wider than the table. If the tabletop shrinks narrower than the breadboard end, it looks odd.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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cdyrssen

5 posts in 291 days


#11 posted 286 days ago

Well I think I am going to go ahead and give this a try and will post pictures of the finished results! Thanks everyone for the input!

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