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Broken tools, need some assistance

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Forum topic by lumberjoe posted 292 days ago 598 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


292 days ago

So last night was one of those nights I should have just went to bed. I “broke” two of my key tools. I’d like to get some advice.

1. The planer. I have an older craftsman planer. This thing is a champ. I bought it 7 years old and heavily used. I’ve also put it through hell. It really has no business turning on. There is something going on in the rollercase. It makes a really high pitched wine and I am pretty sure the infeed roller isn’t spinning. It won’t catch a piece unless I really shove it in. The piece also has trouble making it all the way though. I waxed the table (I do this often anyway) but no help.

The replacement rollers and a chain would cost me about $130. This planer still runs like a champ otherwise. How big of a job is that and is it really worth it? I am fairly mechanically inclined.

2. My bandsaw. This is likely my fault. I think I really over-tensioned my blades in the past using the gauge on the back. I properly tension them now and the gauge isn’t even close (2 blade sizes off). The bearings in the lower wheel seized – well the rear one is locked up completely and the front one spins like it’s full of shrapnel.

Has anyone replaced these before? The bearings are a pretty common size and I am going to get a nice pair to replace them (6203z). Do they need to be pressed in, or can I seat them with a deadblow and a brass punch? There are snap rings on both sides which lead me to believe they are not machine pressed in. I’ll still use a bearing puller to get them out so I don’t damage the aluminum wheels.

For reference this is the Craftsman BAS350 (Rikon 10-320 with gray paint)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts


11 replies so far

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knotscott

5425 posts in 2008 days


#1 posted 292 days ago

Have you cleaned the rollers with alcohol or naptha? (Darn near free to try)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4318 posts in 1681 days


#2 posted 292 days ago

The bearings should be a piece of cake to replace, just be careful when you re-install them to use a piece of pipe or socket to hemmer them back in, tap only on the external race.

For the planer I would say buy a new one with helical head.It is expensive but you will love it.

-- Bert

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 671 days


#3 posted 292 days ago

Is that a lunchbox planer? If so, be careful. When mine started acting wonky it was a plastic gear inside that died. I tried to use it “just one more time” (or maybe 10 times) and the cutterhead dropped on one side and tried to eat a board. Pieces of planer flew everywhere. If you can get the housing off safely maybe you’ll get lucky and find something loose, or a piece of wood jammed where it shouldn’t be. Good luck.

On the bandsaw, I wouldn’t worry about what the gauge reads – they’re never accurate. If it bothers you though then just bend the needle until it’s where you want it.
I changed the wheel bearings on an old Delta – don’t remember the year/model but it was a 14” from about 20 years ago, the same vintage that had all the upper guide assembly made of pot-metal that broke if you looked at it wrong. Those bearings were a press fit and I don’t remember them being easy to get off, but then I don’t remember them having snap-rings either. What’s the make/model? Maybe a manual or exploded diagram can be tracked down.

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


#4 posted 292 days ago

Yup, cleaned them with DNA. No help. I really don’t think it’s spinning. There is a loud gear whine also.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3098 posts in 1308 days


#5 posted 292 days ago

The bearings should be easy and I think they can be pulled and replaced with your finger. The at not a press fit…. I think. The snap rings might be the most difficult part.

The planer….. I don’t know anything about that planer but a repair might still be cheaper than the alternative that Bert suggested. I would love to have one of the new planers with a helical head but I am lacking the money so I would probably opt to try to repair the old one if I used it often. If I used it rarely I might try to do without until I could get in the position to buy that NEW PRIZE. Just what I would have to do.

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


#6 posted 292 days ago

I use my planer A LOT, but I don’t want to replace it unless I have to. The replacement knives are cheap, they last forever, the motor is strong, and I have it tuned well so it barely snipes. The only reason I would upgrade is capacity, but I definitely don’t have the money for a 20” planer. I will likely get a 16/32 drum sander soon anyway.

I’m inclined to agree that the bearings will come out easy. The spacer between them is already rattling around in there. I am going to use a puller anyway because I don’t want to take a chance on scoring the races.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


#7 posted 292 days ago

Joe, I’m not worried about the gauge being off. I started to question it when I needed a step stool to get enough leverage to tension my 5/8” blade to the “right” setting. I found a better method and found I was REALLY over tensioning.

I apply enough tension to keep it on the wheels and set the tracking, then give it a full turn. I then turn the bandsaw on. With the bandsaw running, I adjust the tension until the flutter disappears. Adjust the tracking (if necessary, usually it isn’t) and set the guides.

I also notice I get almost no drift at all using this method.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 671 days


#8 posted 292 days ago

That sounds like an easy method – I’ll give it a try next time I switch out blades.

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tefinn

1207 posts in 1069 days


#9 posted 291 days ago

I’m with Joe on being careful running the planer in that condition. They can and do explode as he describes. It sounds like a gear is stripped in the roller drive. Not a hard or very expensive repair. If you can’t buy new, fix it.

The bearings are likely pressed in, the rings are usually there for safety. Again not a hard or expensive fix. You can do it yourself or get a shop to pull and press the new ones. My local auto place would charge about $20.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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b2rtch

4318 posts in 1681 days


#10 posted 291 days ago

I was thinking about a 15” Grizzly

-- Bert

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distrbd

1069 posts in 1079 days


#11 posted 291 days ago

There’s a product called: rubber renue for reconditioning rubber ,some members from another woodworking forum used it to rejuvenate planer rollers and were quite happy with the result:
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/cleaners/specialty-cleaners/rubber-renue-408a/

-- Ken from Ontario

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