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What finish for bathroom vanity

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Forum topic by ToddJB posted 160 days ago 586 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ToddJB

816 posts in 631 days


160 days ago

All,

I’m converting a dresser into our bathroom vanity. It currently has some sort of finish on it, but I want to put something very durable on it, as it will be getting splashed with water.

I would like to keep the low luster and rustic look. I’m not a fan of shiny.

I’m looking for some specific suggestions that I can pick up a Lowes or HD

Below are some pics



-- I came - I sawed - I over-built


13 replies so far

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LukieB

918 posts in 831 days


#1 posted 160 days ago

I’ve used this stuff before for a somewhat similar project.

A old blanket chest that they didn’t want to be shiny, but wanted to be protected from the kind of water stains that they wanted off of there from cups without a coaster and such. It had served some duty as a coffee table at one point…

-- Lucas, "Someday woodworks will be my real job, until then, there's this http://www.melbrownfarmsupply.com"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3032 posts in 1314 days


#2 posted 160 days ago

It really depends what is on the piece now. I like lacquer best, in the satin finish. It holds up well in bathroom vanity applications. If there is wax on the piece, any film finish like lacquer or poly will give you trouble.
You could try some in an inconspicuous area to see what the results are. If it dries without fish eyes, then you should be okay.
Shellac is also an option.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

76 posts in 1112 days


#3 posted 160 days ago

Looks like it has been stripped or sanded? I woul use water based polyurethane. Several coats.

-- .. heyoka ..

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1320 posts in 862 days


#4 posted 160 days ago

Waterborne poly floor finish.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

816 posts in 631 days


#5 posted 160 days ago

Thanks for the suggestions, guys!

It has not been stripped or sanded, it was just finished with something while still pretty rough. You can see in the second pic that there is a color difference on the side where it goes inside of the cabinet where they stopped with the finish.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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Grandpa

2983 posts in 1176 days


#6 posted 160 days ago

Clint, wouldn’t water harm your finish? I just inspected a 6 year old home that has a LOT of the cabinet finish damaged and worn. It has what looked like drops in the cabinet shelves. These were spot about the size of dimes that looked like water had been dropped on them and the clear finish had come off resulting in lighter places now that the stain is exposed. I am curious about some thoughts on water based poly for cabinets where water damage might occur.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1320 posts in 862 days


#7 posted 159 days ago

Grandpa, short of a conversion varnish or other catalyzed finish, a poly floor finish is about as tough as it gets. I like Bona Mega, an oxygen cross-linking poly.

BTW, on this project, I would strip any old finish completely before doing anything else.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View Keith Glass's profile

Keith Glass

8 posts in 375 days


#8 posted 155 days ago

Cross-linking -poly is the best option for the above shown bathroom vanities.

The two things for this

1 : Highly durable
2 : Highly moisture resistant.

http://www.thertastore.com

-- Keith Glass

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

929 posts in 222 days


#9 posted 155 days ago

I built a mirror frame to go in the bath and used a high gloss lacquer, while that glossy look isn’t what you’re looking for, you could get it in satin and burnish it a little if your looking for even less of a reflective finish. You’d be able to slowly achieve just the sheen your looking for with this method.

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Grandpa

2983 posts in 1176 days


#10 posted 154 days ago

Well, I was reading Clint Searl’s answer above and he says WATER BORNE poly. Is that not water based?? I believe water will cause this to release. Thanks

View Keith Glass's profile

Keith Glass

8 posts in 375 days


#11 posted 151 days ago

You are absolutely right Grandpa.

-- Keith Glass

View Henry6's profile

Henry6

36 posts in 528 days


#12 posted 151 days ago

That is looking good enough,But its wood so make sure that you have coated it already with some stain or there are chances that the wood might come in contact with the water.

View KingoftheForest's profile

KingoftheForest

1 post in 144 days


#13 posted 144 days ago

I build vanities and have found the best top coat is the two part epoxy made by Glaze Coat. Its made for water areas and is also used on bar tops. You pour it on and its leveled using a glue spreader.The finish is gloss but can be dulled up with fine steel wool. It works great for the ruff unsanded serfaces.

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