LumberJocks

Photography Studio

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by DKV posted 284 days ago 838 views 2 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DKV's profile

DKV

3062 posts in 1128 days


284 days ago

I just read a post by Todd Clippinger from about six years ago on how he sets up his photo shoots when taking pictures of his furniture. Pretty nice. I got to thinking about the projects I’ve seen on LJ’s. Background for the project pictures range from the driveway to some pretty elaborate background setups. I think some of you actually have areas set aside for nothing but photo shoots. It would be nice to see pictures of those areas and get some tips on photo shooting projects. You know, things like indirect lighting, no flash, plain background, etc. Some of you guys border on the professional when it comes to shooting pictures for your projects. Like a nice looking plate of food, presentation is half the battle.

-- 2014 will be a different year...at least for me it will.


28 replies so far

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1041 posts in 644 days


#1 posted 284 days ago

Photography is my other hobby I’m pretty serious about, ironically enough, I don’t take the time to set up nice shots for my projects here. I use a canon 5d mkii and multiple strobe lights.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13723 posts in 962 days


#2 posted 284 days ago

This is one of my biggest weaknesses. I will be interested to see the tips posted here.

May I also say that Jeffro does some of my favorite photo shoots that I have seen.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 284 days


#3 posted 284 days ago

A good camera is key albeit the amateur photo contest for National Geographic is some times won with a camera thats near disposable.

I took a photographer course (several actually) and never use the “auto” mode. Bought a new camera, a few lenses, a few lights, a tripod and now take a thousand photos to get 1 good one. They call it the golden triangle, ISO, aperture and shutter speed. I doubt that helped ?

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

1845 posts in 774 days


#4 posted 284 days ago

Make a lightbox out of cardboard or PVC tubing and a cheap white sheet, use a couple desk lamps, and you’re good to go. Doesn’t cost very much and it significantly increases the photo quality. You don’t need a real nice SLR camera. I had a Canon 7D, but ended up getting rid of it since I didn’t use it as much as I would like to.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3062 posts in 1128 days


#5 posted 284 days ago

jmartel, thanks for the tip. I did not know about light boxes. There are many examples on the web. I’m building one.

LJers, show us your light boxes.

-- 2014 will be a different year...at least for me it will.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3062 posts in 1128 days


#6 posted 284 days ago

Here’s a good how to…

http://m.wikihow.com/Create-an-Inexpensive-Photography-Lightbox

-- 2014 will be a different year...at least for me it will.

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1956 posts in 901 days


#7 posted 284 days ago

Here’s a good how to…

Thanks for the link….

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2390 days


#8 posted 284 days ago

One of the keys is to use indirect light. If you plan to shoot outside, shoot early in the morning or after the sun sets. Lots of people think the more light, the better. Not always true. Especially direct sun light.

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

1845 posts in 774 days


#9 posted 284 days ago

Juniorjock. That’s basically the premise behind a lightbox.

A real simple way of thinking about it is to think about the APPARENT SIZE of the light compared to the object. On a bright and sunny day, the sun is a very small light source. Because of it’s small apparent size, you get harsh shadows. On an overcast day, the sun lights up the clouds, which are an order of magnitude larger in apparent size to everyday objects, which is why you will see little to no shadow.

Same thing goes for man-made lights. By creating the light panels in a lightbox, you are increasing the apparent size of the light that the object sees. Instead of the small size of a lightbulb/camera flash bulb, you now have a much larger swatch of lighting panel.

It’s because of this phenomenon that objects (especially reflective objects) look best in the 30min before sunrise and 30min after sunset timeframes.

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2390 days


#10 posted 284 days ago

Yes, I know what you’re saying, jmartel. There are a lot of ways to get past the harshness of direct flash, sun, etc. Most of the time, I try to use available light, but if I’m shooting inside and need to use a flash, I usually try to bounce the light off the ceiling or a wall. I have a set of P.C. Buff White Lightning lights, but they take a while to set up and most of the time, not worth it for just a couple of shots. If you combine a good camera with good optics, a light meter and a set of lights, you can’t go wrong (most of the time). That’s the good thing about digital. Shoot until you get what you want and not have to worry about the cost of film and processing.

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2390 days


#11 posted 284 days ago

Going back to DKV’s OP, there are tons of info on LJ about shooting projects and other things. Lots of good nature photos on here and even more on Garden Tenders.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15683 posts in 2842 days


#12 posted 284 days ago

There are literally books (many of them) on this subject. But the simplest advice I can give you is to shoot lots of photos, from lots of different angles. Shoot some with flash, some with no flash, some with direct light, and some with indirect light. A few of them are going to turn out well, and you will learn what works best for you in the process.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 284 days


#13 posted 284 days ago

light is key

the lower the ISO, the less grainy the photo as it is “still” photography so light is crucial if taken indoors.

Shadows, most often in basic still photography are undesirable, as many strong features of wood should be shown, not hidden so aperture or depth of field pends to exploit what we want to see and what we dont. The lower the number, the less we see in the background, the higher the number, the more we see

shutter speed pend on the above and therefor a tripod is needed to avoid camera shake but as always, the reason why photos could always improve is because we fail to realize how much we need to learn to be good at it.

The combinations and permutations of what we want, are as limitless in photography as they are in woodworking rendering a correct answer to the question as accurate as defining the last number in pi

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 284 days


#14 posted 284 days ago

like Charles says……….never take your finger off the shutter, the more you shoot photos, with 1/2 a brain, you should get better ? as most SLR’s give all the info of the triangle being ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed, the smartest cameras give even more info rendering you with a a multiple choice answer, of evaluating the info, and making a change

if you shoot “RAW” you can even fix a picture that should of been trashed

have you ever tried “layering” ?

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 284 days


#15 posted 284 days ago

showing 1 through 15 of 28 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase