LumberJocks

My Edge Jointing method--tell me what's wrong with it

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by CharlesA posted 293 days ago 759 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1219 posts in 429 days


293 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question jointer plane tablesaw joining

I don’t have a powered jointer, for space and $ reasons, so I’ve been using a jointer plane to joint the edges of lumber. But I’ve found it quite time consuming to get a perfect edge. So this is what I have been doint:

1) Use the plane to get it 90-95% flat—no curves.
2) Rip the other edge using the planed edge against the fence.
3) Rip the planed edge using the newly ripped edge against the fence.

This seems to work well. Thoughts?

Charles

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


16 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1482 days


#1 posted 293 days ago

Sounds real workable to me, Charles. You’re making the most of the tools that you have and your own ingenuity. If that isn’t a definition of what we’re all doing, then I’ll buy you a gallon of glue.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View okwoodshop's profile

okwoodshop

442 posts in 1807 days


#2 posted 293 days ago

I started out the same way, you use what you have but when I finally saved up for a jointer it sure saved a lot of time.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7425 posts in 2280 days


#3 posted 293 days ago

I’ve ripped plenty of glue joints that way, more or less. The joints
are tighter if they’re run on a jointer usually, but if you’re
careful with ripping technique acceptable joints can
often be got right off the saw. They tend to be a bit
more visible after glue-up, but in the greater scheme of
things it’s a nitpick for all but the finest work.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2869 posts in 1119 days


#4 posted 293 days ago

I have no jointer either. Wish I did.
If the stock is under 6” I clamp it together and run it through the planer.
If it’s larger than 6” I use the router table.
I am not against hand tools. There are many times they are required and everyone needs those skills.
Power tools were not invented to be better than hand tools but to allow wood workers to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

It ain’t no fun toiling day after day making a single profile in a production shop. Imagine trying to do it with hand tools.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1219 posts in 429 days


#5 posted 293 days ago

I don’t have a problem using the jointer plane, it’s part of my process of getting to know/become proficient with planes that is really improving my work. And with my method, it sometimes only takes a couple of minutes with the plane. If the board is more out of line, then it is more work, but I did three boards today that couldn’t have taken more than 5 minutes between them. What I don’t have the patience/skill for is final jointing with the plane.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1363 posts in 521 days


#6 posted 293 days ago

Maybe try building a fence for your jointer?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1363 posts in 521 days


#7 posted 293 days ago

Maybe try building a fence for your jointer? Also watch this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJfD0-fFAzI

It helped me tremendously.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

425 posts in 740 days


#8 posted 293 days ago

I have no jointer and I do all my edge jointing with a table saw hold-down jig that rides the miter slot. The jig is annoyingly large for my small shop, but once I go through the trouble of getting it off the wall it does a good job straightening one edge to use a reference to rip the other. I don’t have a proper workbench for using a jointer plane, and to my chagrin I’ll admit I also don’t have the patience or desire to use hand planes – as much as that goes against the grain of this board (all puns intended).

That said, I also don’t tend to work with large pieces of lumber in my 11×17 shop, so a 4’ straightline rip jig tends to suffice for my needs. If I had to joint anything really long, I’d probably do it with a router, a long straightedge, and a bearing-guided straight bit.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1264 days


#9 posted 293 days ago

If it works well…..it works well. Woodworking is a results-driven activity.
I just sold my jointer. I wasn’t using it enough, it was taking up space, and in my damp garage….it was rusting away.
I just use a metal straightedge and a flush cut router bit to joint edges. I rarely work with boards over 3-4ft long.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13785 posts in 970 days


#10 posted 293 days ago

Not as good, but part of that is how much effort you put in to it. Woodworkers in the old days didn’t have joiners and still did an awesome job.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1219 posts in 429 days


#11 posted 293 days ago

I guess what I’m really asking is this: It appears to me that my method gives me two square parallel edges with the minimum of effort given what I have to work with. Can you think of a reason to work harder with the jointer plane to get that edge perfect before hitting the table saw?

BTW, I love how in plane use videos they always choose a really easy to plane wood. Right now I’m working with cedar for a cedar chest, and if someone can get a perfect edge planing with one hand, then they’re really gifted. Between the knots and the gnarly grain, I can’t get it too work.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

425 posts in 740 days


#12 posted 293 days ago

+1 tedstor.

Results are results; if you get glue-line edges with your method, what value would harder work add? The nice thing about edge jointing is that you can tell whether it worked immediately; if the edges align you succeeded, if they do not you didn’t.

I too am making a cedar chest right now, using my TS jig to rip the edges. It works well and my shop smells pretty good but man, that’s a lot of cedar dust.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1584 days


#13 posted 293 days ago

Charles, are you saying you have only one hand? Do you need to know a process for jointing with just one hand?

What is the problem you are having with the edges? Is it that you are having a hard time getting the edge flat along the length or getting the edge to be square with the faces?

-- Mike

View peekasan's profile

peekasan

14 posts in 337 days


#14 posted 293 days ago

OOhhhh that sounds like a ton of work! I would clamp the board to a sled and straightline rip one side if I didn’t have a jointer. You can make a sled that rides in the tablesaw track. A couple of Rockler t-tracks and clamps and it will straighten an edge in one pass. It is basically a large scale tapering jig.

I have a router with offset fence, but honestly I never use it for jointing. I got a used 6” jointer early on, and upgraded to an 8” when the smaller one no longer fit my needs.

Try a TS sled!

View sgmdwk's profile

sgmdwk

259 posts in 504 days


#15 posted 293 days ago

I have used a table saw for years to prep edges for panel glue-ups. Recently I have been using a Stanley No. 6 Fore Plane. I clamp the board to be jointed flat on my bench, with a spacer board underneath. I then lay my plane on its side and plane the board true. It is a crutch because I lack the skill to plane a true 90 degree edge on a board mounted in my vise, but it works great. I have not planed any cedar but have been quite successful on pine, hard maple and oak. I am getting near invisible glue lines with this technique.

-- Dave K.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase