LumberJocks

A question for cutting board makers

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 11-07-2013 01:19 PM 1211 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


11-07-2013 01:19 PM

I have a somewhat simple question in regards to finishing on a cutting board, is it necessary to use beeswax if using mineral oil? Also what makes the difference between a serving board and a cutting board?

Thanks

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


23 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14122 posts in 990 days


#1 posted 11-07-2013 01:20 PM

I just use mineral oil.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2524 posts in 1003 days


#2 posted 11-07-2013 01:35 PM

I use salad bowl finish, no wax. Serving boards are often larger w/ a juice groove around the perimeter.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11423 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 11-07-2013 01:37 PM

G’day, Randy!!!!!!!
I think mineral oil alone is sufficient. I use salad bowl finish , personally.The real thing about a cutting board vs a serving board is that the cutting board is best to be made with end grain to lessen the cut depth from the knife, but we all make cutting boards both ways. Also many cutting boards have juice grooves where it is not needed on a serving board.

My 2 cents worth on this beautiful sunny Michigan morning.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1541 posts in 372 days


#4 posted 11-07-2013 01:50 PM

I use mineral oil alone and remind those who have my cutting boards to keep them oiled with the same.

View gwolfe1977's profile

gwolfe1977

226 posts in 462 days


#5 posted 11-07-2013 02:02 PM

I have used both mineral oil and a butcher block conditioner that has carnuba wax and beeswax in it. I think that the beeswax helps seal the board longer than the mineral oil does.

-- Gary,Nebraska

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#6 posted 11-07-2013 02:15 PM

Here is what I am thinking, since I have a large stock pile of Pecan and Cedar Elm I was thinking of using just the boards by themselves with live edges as cutting / serving boards, no cutting into strips and no glue ups.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3386 posts in 1846 days


#7 posted 11-07-2013 03:18 PM

@ Blackie,

The thing about making boards and trays: You can make them any way you want to….There is no set pattern or special way you have to build them…..It’s a personal project, so just go for the way you want to….Get outside the box, and have fun…....But I would put some protection on the boards, like m.o., or s.b.d….....

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#8 posted 11-07-2013 03:51 PM

Thanks Rick, I have both of the finishes,

Thanks everyone, Jim, Monte, Gary, bigblock and bondo.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

2017 posts in 802 days


#9 posted 11-07-2013 04:30 PM

Beeswax is not needed, but it adds a bit of additional protection from liquids. Not a ton, and after it wears off, no one who buys the board is going to reapply it, but it does keep the board a bit longer between oilings.

View CalgaryGeoff's profile

CalgaryGeoff

937 posts in 1133 days


#10 posted 11-07-2013 09:09 PM

As others have said bees wax is an option. I use it with mineral oil, I heat them both together in a pot and then apply with a cloth to the board. It gives it a higher gloss finish and soaks in when melted.

-- If you believe you can or can not do a thing, you are correct.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#11 posted 11-07-2013 10:25 PM

Thanks Geoff and jmartel

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Roger's profile

Roger

14556 posts in 1456 days


#12 posted 11-07-2013 10:31 PM

Thnx for clearing a most wondered question Randy.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1979 posts in 928 days


#13 posted 11-08-2013 01:04 AM

I’ve researched the why’s and why not’s. These are the things I found from my research. Opinions vary of course, but I think most concur that it is an option and does provide some extra protection than just mineral oil alone. One would have continue to use the mineral oil/bees wax as part of regular maintenance just as they would with just mineral oil to have the added protection. Store enough of the oil wax combination in a mason jar to maintain the board for several recoats. A 3:2 ratio of oil to wax is good. Heat the mason jar in a double boiler until the wax is liquefied and recoat the board as needed. As it cools it will solidify again. So a reheat is needed each time. Bees wax is cheap and can be found at a health food store. Mineral oil is also cheap and can be found at the pharmacy in the laxative section. Both are far less expensive than the ready made stuff you can buy at the big box store
v
I used the mineral oil/beeswax concoction on this board. And the wax mixture does give it extra gloss
v
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/90231
v

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Tooch's profile

Tooch

614 posts in 528 days


#14 posted 11-08-2013 02:59 AM

mineral oil is all you really need, as long as you recoat often.

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#15 posted 11-08-2013 11:08 AM

Wow here is information, while searching where to buy locally I ran across this bit of important information in regards to beeswax.

Though it is a natural substance, it is possible for beeswax to be tainted with impurities such as pesticide residues. The bees can encounter pesticides while foraging, of course. But pesticides are also sometimes introduced into the hive intentionally by beekeepers to combat pests such as Varroa mites that can decimate a hive. (Though when hives are treated according to guidelines, there should be no pesticides in the hive during honey harvest.)

It’s just something to be aware of – particularly if you plan on using the wax in a way in which it will contact food or be absorbed into the skin (such as making a lotion or balm). If it’s a concern to you, you’ll want to buy organic or even pharmaceutical grade beeswax.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase