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Inaccurate measuring tools.

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Forum topic by ashahidan posted 11-07-2013 11:24 AM 1890 views 0 times favorited 74 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ashahidan

64 posts in 1751 days


11-07-2013 11:24 AM

Made in China measuring tools were cheap but their accuracy was unreliable. I was measuring 60cm on a few pieces of planks today with a made in China tape for a. table yesterday. Today I continued with the same task. using a Stanley tape . After cutting them I found those I measured with Stanley measuring tape were almost 5mm longer than those measured with the China made tape.
I was wondering which measuring tape was inaccurate. To check this out I took a 60cm steel ruler and test it on the wood measured with the Stanley. The measurement matched perfectly. The planks measured with the China tape was nearly 5mm in error . As such I had to discard the shorter planks.
If this could happen with the measuring tape it could happen to my made in China set square.as well. I used an English made set square to draw a 90 degrees line on a 1 inch by 4 inches plank. Then I used the Chinese made square to check the line. Now i knew why I made so many errors when making square boxes whenever I used the Chinese tool to measure. The line was out of square by 3mm. And that was across a 4 inch wide plank. The error would be very big on broader planks.
I will not use any Chinese made measuring tools again except for drawing straight lines .

ashahidan

-- asm


74 replies so far

View dusty2's profile

dusty2

315 posts in 2082 days


#1 posted 11-07-2013 11:30 AM

You will have to be very particular, when buying tools, to avoid tools made in China. Many of the brand name manufacturers sell tools made “offshore”.

-- Making Sawdust Safely

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1622 days


#2 posted 11-07-2013 12:30 PM

Look for the sticker.

PRC = Probably Really Crap

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NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1229 days


#3 posted 11-07-2013 12:49 PM

Measuring tools are an area I won’t skimp on.
My steel rules are made in japan shinwa, my combo and double squares are starrett and pec tools, made in the usa, and my wooden folding rules are lufkin and starrett, made in the usa.

In addition, when measuring I try to use a single method across the project so any inconsistencies don’t stack up. I use a tape measure only for rough measurements.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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Tommy Evans

108 posts in 827 days


#4 posted 11-07-2013 01:05 PM

not to downplay the quality , or lack there of, of cheap measuring tools, but working as a carpenter in the 70’s we always were told to use the same measuring tool through out a task. Most “mass produced” tools had variances. Interior trim was susceptible to errors if several tapes were used and compounded by the way others might read a “strong” 8th or quarter inch.

Now, in wood working I find that rule especially relevant. no pun intended.
peace, T

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kizerpea

746 posts in 1020 days


#5 posted 11-07-2013 01:05 PM

+ 1 with nitewalker

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

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bondogaposis

2528 posts in 1004 days


#6 posted 11-07-2013 01:08 PM

The Stanley tape is likely made in China as well.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5636 posts in 2081 days


#7 posted 11-07-2013 01:20 PM

Although I have several tapes and steel rulers, I try not to use them except for gross cuts or to verify that pieces are of the same size. Most of my measurements are made directly or with story sticks.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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bigblockyeti

1544 posts in 373 days


#8 posted 11-07-2013 01:39 PM

I have a brand new Stanley tape here that I got for exchanging my broken Craftsman at Sears due to Craftsman no longer producing tape measures??? Anyway, it’s model 33-281 and it’s made in Thailand!

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bigblockyeti

1544 posts in 373 days


#9 posted 11-07-2013 01:41 PM

Not sure where the Craftsman was made, I’m assuming USA, but I should have required the alternative replacement be made in the USA, as the country of origin was of importance when I purchased the Craftsman in the first place.

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UpstateNYdude

443 posts in 635 days


#10 posted 11-07-2013 01:48 PM

@bigblockyeti – I think you’ll be hard pressed to find anything in the Sears tool section that isn’t very overpriced to be made in the USA anymore, most of their tools don’t even carry the lifetime guarantee anymore which is why it’s no longer worth going with the Craftsman name sadly.

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1566 days


#11 posted 11-07-2013 01:49 PM

”...In addition, when measuring I try to use a single method across the project so any inconsistencies don’t stack up. I use a tape measure only for rough measurements….”

You cracked the code! You/we/us/me could use a stick broken off a tree and be very accurate, IF we follow the above advice.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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patron

13034 posts in 1994 days


#12 posted 11-07-2013 01:50 PM

when working in a cab shop using metric
with 6 guys all cutting different parts
we used a 2’ steel rule
to check all the tapes and bend the hook if needed
so all got the same measurement
as you go beyond 2’ most tapes will wander some
even my tape on the unisaw has a glitch
around 3’ to 4’ on it
so i check the blade with the shop tape
just to be sure

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112083 posts in 2230 days


#13 posted 11-07-2013 02:06 PM

When students shop for even basic tools like a framing square I have I have them check them at the store. In the past I had a student ask me to pick her up a framing square at a box store since I was going there the next day,I checked all nine framing squares they had in stock not one was square, in fact they vaired from a 1/16-1/8th out of square.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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PaulDoug

552 posts in 356 days


#14 posted 11-07-2013 02:21 PM

Not to go too far from the subject, but I feel there is hope of improvement in this “Made in China” stuff. I remember when I was much younger it was the same way with everything “Made In Japan”. Now a lot of Japanese manufactured items are sought out and prefered.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5636 posts in 2081 days


#15 posted 11-07-2013 02:22 PM

Jim, The clerks get mad when you draw lines on their shelving. DAMHIK But, it works.
A steel framing square can be trued with a sharp punch and a hammer. Actually, a good lesson for a student.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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