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shaping a laminated gunstock

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Forum topic by hektor posted 11-06-2013 03:40 PM 1308 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hektor

10 posts in 416 days


11-06-2013 03:40 PM

I am brand new here. I am a senior and I live in Oregon and I am working on a semi finished laminated rifle stock. I would like to buy a hand tool – probably a jack plane – to remove wood from the forend. I haven’t bought many hand tools in a long, long time so I would like some help to choose the best jack plane for the money preferably used. I will no doubt use this for other projects. I searched on E-bay and there are lots of planes out there.
Thanks, Hektor


18 replies so far

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

282 posts in 828 days


#1 posted 11-06-2013 05:02 PM

I am assuming that the rifle stock is in the correct dimension….. A block plane would serve you better as it is a better choice to shape the stock to it’s desire shape. Jack plane is more for flattening and dimensioning. Not so much on shaping wood. A block plane or apron plane would be more suitable here.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/the-block-plane-as-a-shaping-tool

What else are you aiming for in this project? If you want to know further I can go through the list of the entire plane that you can start with

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hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#2 posted 11-06-2013 05:47 PM

Hello John,
This is a Richard’s Micro Fit laminated stock and they typically give you plenty of extra wood so the customers can make it anyway they want. I need to remove wood from the forearm thickness – about 3/4 of an inch.

Thanks

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JohnChung

282 posts in 828 days


#3 posted 11-06-2013 06:05 PM

Hi Hector,

Is it this stock?
http://rifle-stocks.com/laminated_woods.htm
The shape is already established based on the picture….. Just need more info to provide better recommendation. If this is the case a plane would be not suitable. A wood file would be a better choice

The final shaping should be done using a wood file or belt sander.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUHEhd7M60w

A block plane would be more suitable for this initial form:
http://nerdgun.blogspot.com/2011/12/shaping-rifle-stock.html

If this is your first time working with wood files best you take some blank wood and practise. It can screw up your gun stock for not being patient.

If you are still very sure of removing 3/4 of an inch. Then a block plane is suitable. A wood file would take too long. Do you have a picture of the gun stock? I am providing a lot of recommendation without a clear picture….

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MisterInquisitive

32 posts in 850 days


#4 posted 11-06-2013 06:44 PM

Spoke shave.

View hektor's profile

hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#5 posted 11-06-2013 08:15 PM

I have actually done a few of these before, but that was before I was aware of this forum. The stocks come with ample would and lacking for a better word, they sometimes resemble a club. The thumbhole stock I am working on needs to have wood removed – like the last one I made. Their laminated stocks are a little more difficult than the walnut stocks, in my opinion.

I have already epoxied in the aluminum V-block for the bedding, which I had to fit with my router. It will be a nice, tight target stock when I am through. I have used aluminum or steel pillers before. With the V-block, I can use that stock for both of my M 700 target rifles.

I considered a spoke shave, but I kind of think the bigger plane will be more useful for a variety of projects. I have a block plane and a Dremel Multi max roto tool which is pretty handy.

I will post some pictures soon.

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natenaaron

377 posts in 551 days


#6 posted 11-06-2013 08:22 PM

Big planes are really for big going to be flat work. I would use a spoke shave if you are going the hand tool route. You will be surprised how much wood you can remove with one . The school I teach at would poo a brick if a student tried to make a gun stock in wood shop. If you want to keep the shape and your school will let you work on it in their shop, use the power tools (you seem to want to remove wood fast) that is also an option.

View hektor's profile

hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#7 posted 11-06-2013 08:30 PM

I am not a student – I am not certain where that came from. I am retired and this is a semi finished stock. I am merely shaping it on the forend to suit my needs as a prone rifle.

View MisterInquisitive's profile

MisterInquisitive

32 posts in 850 days


#8 posted 11-06-2013 09:30 PM

If you’re doing a thumbhole stock, a Miller’s Falls #1 cigar spoke shave could potentially be very useful. Otherwise a spokeshave, some cabinetmaker’s rasps (or Iwasaki rasps are nice), and some French curve card scrapers would be in order. A jack plane is useful anyway and you could use it for rough shaping, but I think a spokeshave is just the ticket here.

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hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#9 posted 11-06-2013 09:47 PM

The thumb hole shaping / shaving is done already – as I stated, this is a semi finished stock. Again, I am asking about a tool to remove a bit of wood from the forend of the stock. I have used a block plane before, but it takes a while on their laminated wood.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15581 posts in 1321 days


#10 posted 11-07-2013 01:56 AM

I’ve built gun stocks and have almost any size plane made, but other than a block plane, I wouldn’t see a plane being much help. I do agree with MisterInquisitive, a spokeshave, some cabinetmaker’s rasps (or Iwasaki rasps), and some French curve card scrapers would be useful.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#11 posted 11-07-2013 02:00 AM

I already have the files, rasps, a block plane and I don’t require anything to do with making a stock other than to slim down the forend. Like I have already said, I have worked with semi finished wood stocks before.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

282 posts in 828 days


#12 posted 11-07-2013 02:57 AM

Hector,

Looks like you are setup with the tools! :)

Here are the following videos I would recommend watching based on block plane and spoke shave.

Spoke shave:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LkTL76reK8&feature=player_detailpage#t=137

Block plane: This video should help you shape your stock forearm well. I have used a block plane on VERY hard woods. Just have the plane blade sharp. It would be pretty fast.15 mins is more than enough time for a 3/4 thicks at 1 foot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRIzM8IB56M&feature=c4-overview-vl&list=PLKA_Ff0bn9D21X1_fQ8MvZOR6PsRmb1Oh

Happy shaving!

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MisterInquisitive

32 posts in 850 days


#13 posted 11-07-2013 03:52 AM

I’m perceiving that Hektor wants to plane a flat at the front of the stock to accept the receiver, without the tedium of using a block plane. Yes, a jack plane would do that, but given that we have no illustrations to better demonstrate exactly what you want to accomplish, it would appear to me that on such a small area, a plain Jane #4 smoother would suffice and would be a better all-around plane.

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hektor

10 posts in 416 days


#14 posted 11-07-2013 04:29 AM

Once again, the stock came semi finished and I have already fitted the V-block to accept the receiver. I was asking about a way to make it easier to remove wood from the forend. As it has turned out, I just purchased a jack plane from someone on this forum.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

513 posts in 1514 days


#15 posted 11-07-2013 07:54 PM

I’m going to make a recommendation here. You need a small very sharp spoke shave or what is known as a “float” which is a rasp-like file that has very small FLAT sharp teeth on it. It works like a rasp but leaves a very smooth finish that requires hardly any sanding. Good floats are not cheap but they are wonderful to work with. I use them all the time. Try one and you will never go back to a common rasp for fine work!

Highland Hardware sells the Iwasaki “carving files” and floats (actually, the carving files are just larger floats). Here is their web page: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/search.aspx?find=Iwasaki

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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