LumberJocks

question on popular woodworking plan

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by rhybeka posted 11-04-2013 01:51 AM 780 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


11-04-2013 01:51 AM

hey all :)

So I’m working on a miter saw stand project I found in a library book, published by popular woodworking I think. I keep meaning to do a short writeup on it but forgetting. It’s a great book! Anyway, the plans for the stand and it’s helper stand call for trimming the 2×4 parts down to 1 1/4×3 1/4. Squaring the edges seems like a good idea, but it also sounds like a lot more work (at least in my experience since it didn’t occur to me to do the adjustments before using the miter saw to cut them to rough length. So my questions are – really is trimming them down actually necessary? provide for a better finished project? Or could one just leave them at 2×4 and be just fine? Curious as to the general consensus :)

My other question is just what the best way to trip the 1 3/4 in wide face down to 1 1/4? I’ve got the blade set to take off about half , then I’m flipping it over and taking the other half off. I’m still ending up with some ridges in the middle since it doesn’t seem to be completely even. My thought was I could just sand these smooth and it would be good to go.

-- aspiring jill of all trades


12 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

4386 posts in 515 days


#1 posted 11-04-2013 02:12 AM

I’m assuming you don’t have a planer or a jointer. Are your 2* 4’s as straight as possible when you bought them. Even the straightest ones can be made straighter with a jointer and a planer. I would say the most important thing about a miter station is that the table surface is coplanar with the saw’s table. Next is that you don’t want the fence part that you add to be bowing into the cutting area thereby holding your work piece away from the saw’s fence. So I think that cutting those boards down is meant to add a degree of accuracy and straightness.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Lee Barker's profile (online now)

Lee Barker

2164 posts in 1508 days


#2 posted 11-04-2013 04:19 AM

If you leave the wood 1 1/2×3 1/2, it will look like 2×4 furniture, and you’re obviously beyond that stage.

Yes, cut the pieces down, and your flipping them is the best you can do. You can hand plane out the ridge or sand.

I can’t say for sure without seeing the print, but it is likely that if you don’t cut the material down per the plan, something will go south in the process because those new dimensions aren’t completely independent from other parts’ dimensions.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#3 posted 11-04-2013 11:53 AM

Thanks guys- that’s what I was thinking.

Bill – from what I remember yes, they were the straightest I could find, or at least thinking what wasn’t straight on the ends would be off cuts anyway. All of these boards though have sat in my garage/shop for at the least 3 months – some upwards of a year. Good thought – I can get my hands on a planer actually – if I can get to my dads to get it from him. Taking my number 5 plane to them might be a quicker option and at least more skill building :D

Thanks Lee :) I’m trying to be – I’m a stickler for following directions, but I’m also attempting to further my skills. I think I’ve figured I need a fence addition of some kind to help make this process safer. I saw yesterday where my fence actually has screw holes in it for such an addition. I was quite happy!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View RPhillips's profile

RPhillips

465 posts in 494 days


#4 posted 11-04-2013 12:07 PM

One tip if you are using construction lumber either pay a little more and get premium lumber, it will be drier and typically straighter. You could also go for 2×8’s (or larger depending on your project) and rip them down on the table saw. Just make sure to let them dry some before using as construction grade lumber is typically very “wet”.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#5 posted 11-04-2013 10:39 PM

well, I wouldn’t think my 10 inch table saw would have an issue with cutting the 2×4s down but apparently I could be in the market for a new saw. Had a framing blade in the saw, saw the power dim but not die (like I’d kicked the circuit) and the saw quit. Didn’t smell the motor or anything electrical – just the smell of burnt 2×4. I’m hoping it just has an overheat kick off safety – but being built in 1982 or 3 I don’t have much hope. time to go read the table saw reviews!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

4386 posts in 515 days


#6 posted 11-04-2013 10:52 PM

Yikes.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#7 posted 11-05-2013 01:41 AM

:) false alarm – daaarn ;) I replaced the blade on the saw and pushed a bit slower once I found the circuit reset button :) Never hurts to look though. I’ve been eyeing the porter-cable at Lowes for a while now – just can’t justify it. besides, I’m a bit partial to the craftsman – it was my dads and possibly my granddads saw so there’s a bit of family history with it. I’m excited to build some add ons for it, but yet wondering where to find the time to do that and the projects that I need to have completed before the first snow flies. I’ve got all of the 2×4s down to 1 1/4 x almost 3 1/4 – i think the 3 1/4 is more like 3 3/8 so it may take another pass…I’d rather be over than under! I’ll have some sanding/planing ahead of me anyway just to get the saw marks out in spots. I’d post the plans if I could – I scanned them in on our copier at work so I could print them out to use them and mark them up but I’m sure that would violate copyright somewhere. :(

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#8 posted 11-09-2013 06:33 PM

Well, I’m thinking this is more of a power tool question, but since this thread has my backstory I thought I’d start here. I’ve managed to get all of my pieces to rough size, but I’m still having issues getting my saw/blade adjusted properly or to know if this is just due to the wood being warped, but I thought I’d ask here. I checked the blade and verified squareness, etc. cut one side just below half, flip upside down/backwards to cut the other side and this is what I’m ending up with. I don’t mind chiseling or sanding the center, but the fact that they won’t match up eve after that is concerning. I’m sure it’s something I’m missing or just that the wood is cupped,twisted or warped. Thoughts?

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#9 posted 11-10-2013 02:02 PM

well, the more I think on this I think it’s more of a table saw alignment issue. guess I’ll repost over there!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2876 days


#10 posted 11-10-2013 02:12 PM

It looks to me like your blade is not at 90 degrees to the table.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View wyeth's profile

wyeth

135 posts in 1886 days


#11 posted 11-10-2013 02:21 PM

If the side you are running against the saw fence is not perfectly true then you can never expect your cuts to match up when you flip the board. You have to get two surfaces planed and at 90 degrees to each other before you go to the table saw or use some sort of jig which has a true edge that runs against the saw fence while holding your untrue timber as it is ripped by the saw blade. Does that make any sense?

-- David Australia

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

266 posts in 1780 days


#12 posted 11-15-2013 10:08 PM

That’s what I was figuring, David. Thanks :) Unfortunately I don’t have a jointer or a planer. I’m still even in process of learning how to correctly use my #4 block plane. I’ve been able to correct some of my issues, but obviously with a bit of warpage things are off in places. The directions on the plan could also be a bit better, but I’m roughing it as I go in spots.

-- aspiring jill of all trades

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase