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Forum topic by NickB posted 10-31-2013 05:49 PM 863 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


10-31-2013 05:49 PM

I have a large shed in my back yard that needs some doors installed before the snow flies. The opening is 6’ wide x 80” high. I’d like them to be simple, swing out barn doors. They’ll be painted to match.

I think it will make sense to have a larger and smaller door. Most of the time, the larger one will remain latched and just the smaller door will operate as a man door. I’m thinking 30” and 42”. Any thoughts on 30” and 42” sizing? How about on the location of the center vertical rail? Is there a standard?

I’m contemplating using common dimensional pine lumber 2×6’s for the frames. I know I’ll have to mill it straight, and fill defects before painting. I am a bit concerned with how it will hold up, but I don’t want to invest a whole lot of money into these. I figured some decent plywood for the panels, painted and caulked at the edges. Any thoughts on plywood & 2×6 construction? What kind of ply would you recommend?

My plan is to use blind M&T to join the horizontal boards to the verticals. And rout a groove in the frame for the plywood panel. Basically allow the panel to float and just seal it up with caulking. I guess I would be gluing up the frame around the panels. I’ve never tried anything like this before. Does this method make sense?

I’m struggling with the joinery. The picture below is my initial idea for the M&T/groove combo. Is there a better or easier way to design the joinery?

Any help, suggestions, insight is greatly appreciated!


13 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1534 posts in 370 days


#1 posted 10-31-2013 06:02 PM

I think it looks good. I’ve had good results with construction grade lumber, the main thing is make sure it’s completely dry before milling or it will move more. The M&T construction should provide plenty of strength, if a bit complicated, another option that has worked well for me is a half lap joint at the intersection of the rails and stiles. To further simplify it, you could route a rabbet in the back to receive the panel and install some kind of trim as a retainer to allow for much easier repair or modification in the future.

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#2 posted 10-31-2013 07:10 PM

Thanks, bigblockyeti. I did consider what you mentioned about trim molding the panel in. It would definitely make everything easier.

I hadn’t considered using a half lap joint. I guess I do want to keep it somewhat complicated, if for no other reasons that to justify some of these tools and to challenge my skills (and get some practice while I’m at it).

Thank you especially for the confirmation of the construction lumber being ok.

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#3 posted 11-01-2013 02:17 PM

Can anybody suggest a type of plywood that would work well? I was thinking sanded maple ply since I think it will paint well. Does that make sense?

View rjr1944's profile

rjr1944

1 post in 316 days


#4 posted 11-02-2013 01:39 PM

I have made same size doors for 2 sheds using lap joints (screws & glue) and used hardy board for recessed panels instead of plywood.

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 676 days


#5 posted 11-02-2013 01:59 PM

I like to see some cross bracing in things like doors. Here is a old idea from TV that i have seen my father use and it is functional.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112059 posts in 2227 days


#6 posted 11-02-2013 02:58 PM

Your plan sounds good just use Kiln dried material and I would suggest MDO it last for years outside even without paint it’s used on signs and paint’s up very nicely.

http://www.signwavedesigns.com/MDO%20Plywood.htm

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#7 posted 11-02-2013 03:14 PM

Whiskers,
That was a major concern for me. I’ve always built gates with cross bracing, but these are my first doors. The look is not what I’m going for, but I suppose I could add some braces on the back side. \

rjr1944,
Your doors look great and that is pretty much the look I’m going for. That building has great appeal and the covered porch is awesome. Do you have any additional diagonal bracing in place like Whiskers has mentioned? Any concern with sag?

And thank you both for your input!

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#8 posted 11-02-2013 03:17 PM

a1Jim,
I’ve never heard of this product, but it looks like it would fit the bill well. Any idea on where I could source this material?

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#9 posted 11-02-2013 03:21 PM

Redesigned the joinery

I redesigned the M&T joinery. Simpler is better :) This gives me the 1/2” grooves and blind mortise and tenons.

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a1Jim

112059 posts in 2227 days


#10 posted 11-02-2013 03:24 PM

This might help

http://www.woodfinder.com/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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NickB

8 posts in 318 days


#11 posted 11-02-2013 03:34 PM

Thanks for the link. That could come in handy down the road, too.

Ouch. 89 miles to the nearest supplier…

I may just use some cheap sanded ply, paint it, hit it with 6-8 coats of polycarbonate urethane and cross my fingers. Is there anything other than the veneer that would make a maple ply any better than a sanded pine?

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a1Jim

112059 posts in 2227 days


#12 posted 11-02-2013 03:37 PM

Any lumber store should carry it.
Just ask for MDO

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 676 days


#13 posted 11-02-2013 03:50 PM

I have been having excellent results with ordinary CDX ply building mobile tool stands etc. What I do is smooth joint compound over both sides to fill the pores and any voids and sand it smooth. Than a coat of primer and 2 generous coats of floor and porch enamel and it looks nice and smooth and is totally weather proof, although that isn’t a requirement in my application. Very Cheap. Stay away from that Valspar junk that Lowe’s sells though. The cheap stuff from wal-mart is much better and cheaper. It made by Sherwin Williams.

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