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Forum topic by Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor posted 10-29-2013 05:40 PM 977 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5081 posts in 1960 days


10-29-2013 05:40 PM

Support Handmade Work

It’s FREE and you know you should do it…!

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.


21 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14128 posts in 990 days


#1 posted 10-29-2013 05:50 PM

Done deal

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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SCOTSMAN

5361 posts in 2237 days


#2 posted 10-29-2013 07:10 PM

Good hand made work mwill never lose the support of the recipient never never imho.I have never met or heard of anyone who did not like well made things My 2 cents oh and I do wgoleheartedly support your efforts god bless Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#3 posted 10-29-2013 08:42 PM

Pledge #2057

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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LittlePaw

1571 posts in 1730 days


#4 posted 10-29-2013 09:50 PM

That’s Right! I just posted : “My creations are proudly carved in America by an American! I know what CNC, laser, router replicators , etc., are and I would not have any of them touch my work – period!” That said, there is nothing WRONG in using such machines; there is a place for it. Just be HONEST and state that up front and don’t mislead people by pretending its hand made. They are NOT!

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

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poopiekat

3624 posts in 2386 days


#5 posted 10-29-2013 10:29 PM

Theoretically, it ain’t going to happen. If we were all in buzzing little villages, bartering eggs for wool, butter and milk for lumber, and a society that did not rely on hard cash to operate.. then maybe. We don’t live that way, and we don’t WANT to live that way. Our ancestor’s toil brought on the Industrial Revolution for good reason: We wanted to live better.

We should do what we can to preserve the ancient arts, of course. We can instill the love of handcrafted items in new generations, lest it be lost.

I tend to think of it as a niche market, one which you can either choose to support, or not. How do you even state your case to an IKEA customer?

And, hey, does your camera use film? Did you even consider for one second, how many people you’ have put out of work at Fotomat???

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile (online now)

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5081 posts in 1960 days


#6 posted 10-29-2013 11:06 PM

All any of us can do is support what we believe in…regardless of the size of the niche’ market. Ignore it and it most certainly will die over time…

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

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poopiekat

3624 posts in 2386 days


#7 posted 10-29-2013 11:25 PM

True enough, Greg!

I’ve preached for a long time, the benefits and gratifying rewards you can enjoy with hand work, only to be targeted by those who believe that the latest machine will make them a better woodworker.

I was at a “Scattered Seeds” fall crafts fair, the big one in this neck of the woods. I seek out the woodworkers, an ever smaller number of them set up each year. Along with the turners and cutting board artists, there was a guy who made game boards, Parcheesi boards, Chinese Checker boards, and other table-top games. All done with CNC and Laser graphics.. made me very sad. People, especially women, swooned over them, ...sheesh.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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rance

4132 posts in 1812 days


#8 posted 10-30-2013 07:44 AM

Greg,

I’m sorry but I cannot support the cause. I like my power tools too much. I will not give up my table saw, power miter saw, jointer, planer, scrollsaw, or cnc for handplanes, chisels and axes. I don’t lie to those that I sell my artwork to either. I tell them I use power tools. I really hate sweating while doing my woodworking. Sweat & sawdust just don’t go together well. :) I wish you well though.

I have to agree with you Poopie, the machine don’t make the man. I’ve seen woodworkers that try that methodology and it just doesn’t work.

Rance

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1164 days


#9 posted 10-30-2013 10:45 AM

OK after reading Rance comment, got me to thinking, all of my woodworking, I use power tools does this mean my project’s aren’t handcrafted? Is there a fine line when it comes to using power tools and handcrafting?

I can see using a CNC for engraving such as a name on a box that I made that a customer wants personalized though I don’t have one and don’t plan on getting one.

I know these people that you speak of Poopie, there’s one fellow that I’ve seen in several shows that I attend, he uses a laser to engrave small wooden signs with quotes and claims to be a woodworker but is he any different then us that use power tools? I think this would be a great question for a new forum topic, get others opinions.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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hobby1

282 posts in 950 days


#10 posted 10-30-2013 02:02 PM

All power tools that require a manual controle, for the end product, produces a manual (handcrafted) article.

Any time the workman has no controle over the process, it is no longer a handcrafted article.

The whole project can contain both manual, labor, (handcrafting) and automation labor (computer controled), therefor the end results, will be a handcrafted project, with automative parts integrated.

If the project is assembled without the aid of manual labor, it is definitively, an automated produced project.

So the fine line, is not a fine line when you consider the percentage of manual labor over nonmanual labor.

Sidenote, every powertool, that requires manual controle, is handcrafting process.

This is my opinion, that you requested in your post, for our opinions.

This is an excerpt from the innernet.

Quote:
“Numerical control (NC) is the automation of machine tools that are operated by precisely programmed commands encoded on a storage medium, as opposed to controlled manually via hand wheels or levers, or mechanically automated via cams alone. Most NC today is computer numerical control (CNC), in which computers play an integral part of the control.”
Unquote.

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hobby1

282 posts in 950 days


#11 posted 10-30-2013 09:32 PM

I posted the above in the wrong catagory, sorry about that.

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Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5081 posts in 1960 days


#12 posted 10-31-2013 12:56 AM

I feel that handmade is a piece of work that is not mass produced in a factory…Handmade, in my opinion is created by a individual making a piece of work from start to finish with hands-on process during each step of the piece…regardless of the use of tools that are used.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

View LittlePaw's profile

LittlePaw

1571 posts in 1730 days


#13 posted 10-31-2013 01:42 AM

That’s right, Greg. You summed it up nicely, but there’ll always be those who want to go on tangents with “what if . . .” and the “what about . . ?” and just argue for argument sake. I think Greg said it all – and to the point: do it all by hand regardless of the tool you use and call it hand made. But if you can turn on a piece of equipment, walk away and let the machine do the making, it aint’ hand made. Isn’t that what Greg said? What more is there to argue about?

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

View rance's profile

rance

4132 posts in 1812 days


#14 posted 10-31-2013 02:37 AM

>I think this would be a great question for a new forum topic

Blackie, it has been asked before here on LJ. IMO, handmade is whatever you say it is. And that line is all over the map, depending on who you ask. If you want us ALL to agree on one place for that line, then you’ll be waiting a loooooooong time. :) That’s just the way it is. I disagree with some of the lines drawn above, but that’s ok.

I’ve seen some things that were mass produced in a factory, but given the significant amount of hand work on them throughout the process gives it my nod as being hand-made. Have you ever seen the Steinway video on building pianos? Very fascinating. And hand made IMO.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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bullhead1

228 posts in 901 days


#15 posted 10-31-2013 05:27 AM

OK, I’m guilty. I have a cnc and I’ve really enjoyed the things it can do and the challenges it has presented. I have never presented any thing I have done as hand crafted (even the things I’ve done without the cnc), but by coincidence I am doing a small craft show this weekend that has been advertised as handcrafted venders by the promoter. I’m sure there will be house wives that have bought parts made on a cnc and machined milled beads to make their hand crafted items. I really don’t care, this is all about having a satisfying hobby or occupation that makes you a little beer money or for those more serious, a living. I have great respect for those that have no power in their shop and only use hand tools to make some beautiful creations.
To me, the cnc is just another tool for a shop and those that think you just slap a board on the table, push a button and go take a nap, find someone that has one and see the process. Projects made with them present many of the same challenges of traditional wood working.

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