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Grizzly G0490 8" Jointer w/Byrd Shelix assembly thread

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Forum topic by darthford posted 10-29-2013 06:50 AM 1108 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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darthford

532 posts in 577 days


10-29-2013 06:50 AM

I thought I would chronicle assembly of the G0490 and installation of the Byrd Shelix cutter head to document any issues and solutions.

In this first pic I have unbolted the motor from its shipping location and mounted it onto the motor bracket inside the cabinet. I also installed the dust collector outlet and mobile base lift wheel. I got the beast up on the stand with the Kubota tractor, its not a one man job without a hoist or method of lifting it.

Issue #1 – Hand space is cramped around dust collector sheet metal when installing the 8 bolts to hold the jointer to the stand. Plus you can only get about a 1/8 turn on some of them with an Allen wrench. Recommend a long extension and Allen head socket for this job as ideal, I made due with a long screw driver to get the bolts snug then a short Allen wrench and suffered through the 1/8 turns.

Here I have removed the straight knife cutter head, I backed off the table stops and lowered both tables to maximum, the 4 bolts were not very tight in fact I found a number of fasteners that were not very tight so I’ll be checking them all as I go. The cutter head came right out with no issues.

Here is my victory picture, the bearings and these cast iron blocks have been successfully removed from the old straight knife cutter head and installed on the new Byrd Shelix cutter head. It was not without drama however.

Issue #2 – Pay no attention to the instructions, you can’t tap these bearings off the old straight knife cutter head with a dead blow hammer and block of wood. The narrow left green cast iron block tapped right off without much effort…leaving the bearing still firmly attached to the cutter head shaft. The right one would not budge, note the bearing in the right wider cast iron block is held in place with a snap ring on the inside of the block.

A trip to Harbor Freight and I’m now the proud owner of a 12 ton hydraulic press. I used some scrap lumber to make a box for the cutter head (4 sides and a bottom nothing fancy) so it would stand up straight on the hydraulic press and drop onto the block of wood as I pressed the bearings off the straight knife cutter head. First up was the wider right hand cast iron block and bearing, it went BANG!! when it let loose no way it was going to be hammered off as per the instructions.

Issue #3 – The left side narrow cast iron block tapped off the bearing easily but there’s a problem. The bearing is firmly pressed onto the shaft and there is not much room behind that bearing to get old of it. Maybe they make a gear/bearing puller that’s small enough I don’t know but you have to get under the inside bearing race and apply force there so you don’t ruin the bearing. There’s only about 3/16” of space. I happened to have 2 thin box end wrenches for getting into narrow spaces that were about 3/16” inch thick, I sandwiched the bearing between them and used the press to pop the bearing off. The press had bent the wrenches significantly before it cut loose with a BANG!! that’s how tight it was on there.

Re-installing the bearings was straight forward though I used anti-seize as the factory should have. The left bearing was easy using a socket, I used a 3.5 inch piece of black iron pipe filed flat to seat the right bearing/cast iron block as the shaft sticks out a couple inches for the pulley. Speaking of which the bolt holding the pulley on was fairly loose and I read about a couple instances where peoples pulleys had fallen off. I may put some blue Locktite on that bolt holding it on. NOTE: The left and right bearings are two different sizes.

Tomorrow I’ll continue with the assembly and cleaning.


7 replies so far

View unbob's profile

unbob

396 posts in 556 days


#1 posted 10-29-2013 07:05 AM

Just saying from the industrial end, bad practice to reinstall bearings. They are cheap enough to use new ones.

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RPhillips

449 posts in 489 days


#2 posted 10-29-2013 10:46 AM

Just a thought on the bearing removal, you could have put the assembly in the freezer for a bit then used a propane torch to quick heat up the bearing slightly and that should have freed them up enough to be removed with a few light blows. I have done this many times at home and I’ve seen it done on a larger scale at work, all though the bearings and shafts were much bigger and they used Nitrogen to cool the assembly, it still came off just the same.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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paxorion

661 posts in 698 days


#3 posted 10-29-2013 01:27 PM

I wonder if your posts might be better consolidated as a blog. It’ll make it a lot easier to keep up with all of your posts.

-- paxorion

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darthford

532 posts in 577 days


#4 posted 10-29-2013 04:10 PM

unbob – I agree but as these are brand new bearings and I removed them without damaging them I decided to get a few miles from them. Now that I have this task sorted out I could replace the bearings later probably in an hour.

RPhillips – Yes my brother suggested the same but these are sealed bearings and small there’s no easy way to apply heat and not melt the seal. If I were replacing the bearings then yes this method may have worked though while more expensive I think the hydraulic press was the proper way to go. Now I just have to figure out some other use for a 12 ton hydraulic press. lol

paxorion – A blog hmmm…you may have a point there as I’m researching mortising machines for my next purchase and found some interesting information.

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darthford

532 posts in 577 days


#5 posted 10-29-2013 05:27 PM

FYI I have moved this to a blog http://lumberjocks.com/darthford/blog/38326 thanks for the suggestion paxorion

View RPhillips's profile

RPhillips

449 posts in 489 days


#6 posted 10-30-2013 01:21 AM

You should be able to remove the seal fairly easily. Just use a and Exacto #11 knife and remove the seals, they should just pop off and then do what you need to do, then reinstall them.

I do this all the time with much smaller bearings, 4×8mm,etc., for RC cars and the construction so be exactly the same. The only problem that you may have is if the inner bearing guide is made of phenolic materials, even then they will take some heat, just don’t over do it.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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RPhillips

449 posts in 489 days


#7 posted 10-30-2013 01:30 AM

OH, and FYI… lateral loads on a radial bearings can damage them, this includes installs/removal. Make sure that when you are using the press that the load is place against the inner race as to keep the lateral load off the bearings.

I work in the oil industry and we have some rather large rotating equipment and I know that the hot/cold method is the approach that our machinists take when possible.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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