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Forum topic by dawsonbob posted 268 days ago 662 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


268 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi, fellow Lumber Jocks. I have a few questions for you, if I may. Actually, I can’t even call myself a Lumber Jock at this point: I’m too new for that. Clueless newbie wanna be would be a better term for me.
I’m working on my very first project at the moment, and I’m a little confused by a couple of things. I know what I want, but I’m not quite sure of some of the details.
The thing you see in the picture is my project. It’s not glued up yet, just dry fitted as a test. It’s made out of pine, and that presents one of the problems. Because of the way it’s made, finishing will be a real bear once I glue it up: can I finish first, and then glue it up, or will that cause the glue not to stick?
As far as finishing goes, what I’m after is an antique look (think about 300 years old). I want to distress it, then finish it where the dings/scratches/depressions are darker than the high points. I’ve seen it done, but I don’t know how it was done. If I weren’t trying for an old look, I’d just shellac it, then seal it with varnish… but I am trying for antique. Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

Sorry if I got this in the wrong forum. It can be moved if it is.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection


21 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10374 posts in 1603 days


#1 posted 268 days ago

You can certainly prefinish the pieces that are accessible. Glue wont stick to a finished surface so youre correct on that. You can tape off the areas that will be glued.

Below are some doors I made from pine aiming for that aged look. I used 2 coats of amber shellac then followed up with a coat of general finished dye stain, medium brown or medium walnut if I remember correctly. I wiped it off kind of randomly throughout the piece letting some areas soak longer than others. I also used a hand plane against the grain in some spots which helped darken up some areas.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#2 posted 268 days ago

Those doors have character: I love them! That’s kind of the feel that I’m looking for (but in a much smaller project, of course). Hadn’t thought of the tape: good idea. Thanks.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3264 posts in 1410 days


#3 posted 268 days ago

I would brush a coat of thinned shellac on it (pre-stain conditioner). Then stain it to your desired color. Finish with shellac, lacquer, or poly. Dark wax can add an aged look because it leaves some residue in the corners.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#4 posted 268 days ago

Leaving the dark residue in the corners and depressions is what I’m after. I was hoping to be able to do it with some kind of stain so it would be more permanent than wax would be, although I do intend to wax it as a last step. Any way to do it with stain? Thanks.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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chrisstef

10374 posts in 1603 days


#5 posted 268 days ago

This is what the dye stain looks like in the can for reference. The amber is just a stock photo. It comes in multiple colors.

In the corners or where you want it darker, just leave the dye there on a bit longer than the rest. To get a deeper penetration you might want to only use one coat of shellac and sand it back with 320.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#6 posted 268 days ago

if thats your first project, you’re off to a great start.

Here is a project I did that i distressed.
Look at Hmikes and maybe even buy the book he recommends.

And see if some of Smitty's tips help.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1309 posts in 364 days


#7 posted 268 days ago

I made a bar once and wanted the top to look like an old work bench. After beating some bent nails and screws on the surface, used some pine charcoal and crushed it to dust and rubbed it on the surface. Then a coat of spar varnish. It came out looking pretty good. You have done a great job on your first project. I also finish my projects before assembling them. Take care

-- earthartandfoods.com

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#8 posted 268 days ago

@crisstef. I read somewhere about dye stains, and they sound pretty good. I wonder where I can get that stuff here in San Diego?

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

558 posts in 491 days


#9 posted 268 days ago

dawsonbob – Woodcraft and Rockler each have a wall full of General cans.

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#10 posted 268 days ago

Thanks, Don W. It is my first project, and it’s actually kind of crude. I’m trying to get the feel of old New Mexican rustic furniture, so a little bit crude is probably okay. It’s almost all done with hand tools, although I did need a jigsaw for some parts.

Thanks for the links; they’re very helpful. I ordered the book from Amazon, since I plan on making a lot of rustic pine furniture. Thanks.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#11 posted 268 days ago

mrjinx. Thanks. So it can be safely done to finish before assembly? This project is entirely dependent on fitting (dovetails and mortises, oh my!), so it has to be glued: there are no metal fasteners used anywhere in this project.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#12 posted 268 days ago

ColonelTravis. I have a Rockler just a few miles away. I’ll check them out for the General finishes.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#13 posted 268 days ago

oh, and I would finish it before gluing as well.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

381 posts in 352 days


#14 posted 268 days ago

Don W. Thanks. Another vote for finishing first. I think that trying to get in between the shelves and into the dovetails would be an absolute bear once it’s assembled, so finishing first seems like a good idea, as long as I can get the glue to hold afterward.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#15 posted 268 days ago

I typically try to avoid the obvious area that will be glued together without getting insane. You can also tape some off. A quick swipe with sand paper or file can help. A final coat or 2 of finish is put on after glue up to even it out.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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