LumberJocks

Bare poplar

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by phlyers posted 10-28-2013 12:58 PM 829 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View phlyers's profile

phlyers

93 posts in 474 days


10-28-2013 12:58 PM

Looking for some opinions on what type of primer/paint for bare poplar. I’m looking for a smooth semi gloss finish. Should I be using an oil based primer and sanding after priming then adding the color?

I’m hoping to only have to apply 1 coat of the finish coat due to production reasons and from what i’m reading the oil based primers will promote good adhesion with minimal top coats.


11 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3456 posts in 1657 days


#1 posted 10-28-2013 01:11 PM

Poplar is very paintable.
Any good primer/paint should work.
I don’t sand primer. That defeats the purpose of primer. It’s supposed to be something for the paint to grab on to.
If you want semi gloss that’s all the more reason to not sand.

An exception would be water base primer. I’d use two coats and sand the raised grain in between coats.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1473 posts in 1047 days


#2 posted 10-28-2013 01:13 PM

A waterborne acrylic wall/trim paint will meet your needs. No separate primer is necessary.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View phlyers's profile

phlyers

93 posts in 474 days


#3 posted 10-28-2013 01:14 PM

Last night I just put a coat of flat white paint on a piece of scrap (no primer) it left a rough surface after it dried. Will an oil based primer eliminate the rough surface?

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1473 posts in 1047 days


#4 posted 10-28-2013 03:54 PM

The first coat of anything will leave a more or less rough surface because it will cause the exposed wood fibers to dry standing up. They’re called nibs. They need to be eliminated by sanding with a fine abrasive. I use either 220 drywall sanding screen or maroon scotchbrite. The second coat will dry smooth.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View JayCop's profile

JayCop

32 posts in 1120 days


#5 posted 10-28-2013 03:59 PM

Consider raising the grain by spraying a light mist of water on the project and sanding with your last grit of sand paper before finishing. Make sure you let it dry all the way so it doesn’t just load your sand paper.

View lazyoakfarm's profile

lazyoakfarm

144 posts in 1483 days


#6 posted 10-28-2013 04:19 PM

I’m always looking for something better but my last project I used Zinsser BIN primer. I had a little chipping on the sharp edges for some reason. I will round the edges a little more next time. I did lightly sand it because it felt very rough and i wanted a smooth finish. The color coat was Sherwin Williams Proclassic water based. Good stuff! Add some Flowtrol to help level it. I then used a glaze and a top coat of General Finishes Performance. I don’t think you will find a better top coat than this stuff. It is silky smooth like a rose pedal. Its only been on for a couple of months so I cant tell you how it holds up on kitchen cabinets. So far its great.

I sprayed everything but the glaze. It was applied with a rag of course. I used the General Finishes Glaze, but I found it dried way too quick and it was difficult to keep a semi uniform look between cabinet doors. I wanted to use an oil, but didn’t know if I could use the Performance over the top of the oil.

View hansman1982's profile

hansman1982

23 posts in 613 days


#7 posted 10-28-2013 07:42 PM

“Consider raising the grain by spraying a light mist of water on the project and sanding with your last grit of sand paper before finishing. Make sure you let it dry all the way so it doesn’t just load your sand paper.”

I’d wait until you have some sort of other surface built up on the wood before you sand away the raised grain, otherwise you are just cutting other wood fibers to be raised. My best success with pine has been to wait until I put on my first coat of polyurethane and then sand it down.

-- I'm New! I'm New! I Don't Know What To Do!

View cutworm's profile

cutworm

1065 posts in 1479 days


#8 posted 10-29-2013 12:21 AM

I like the General Finishes Milk Paint. No primer needed. I have used it several times now and really like it. Water borne and dries fast.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 579 days


#9 posted 10-29-2013 01:11 AM

What’s with all the poplar threads lately? Just saying.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View hansman1982's profile

hansman1982

23 posts in 613 days


#10 posted 10-29-2013 02:27 AM

Poplar is popular?

Hahaha I am clever.

-- I'm New! I'm New! I Don't Know What To Do!

View phlyers's profile

phlyers

93 posts in 474 days


#11 posted 10-29-2013 02:33 AM

At $1.25 a BF it’s “popular” with me!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase