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Help with finishing a wall mounted bottle opener

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Forum topic by scrapbmxrider16 posted 270 days ago 486 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scrapbmxrider16

19 posts in 278 days


270 days ago

Hello,

I am looking for help on finishing a wall mounted bottle opener. I am looking for a high gloss and durable finish.I have always finished with wipe on poly. Are there any other options? The opener is walnut with maple inlays.


8 replies so far

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1567 days


#1 posted 270 days ago

If it’s got awkward contours, spraying is probably best. Look for a high gloss rattle can – but practice first.

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crank49

3337 posts in 1569 days


#2 posted 270 days ago

Paint?
Paint doesn’t get any more durable than Dupont Imron.
Or more expensive either.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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scrapbmxrider16

19 posts in 278 days


#3 posted 269 days ago

Why in the world would you paint walnut with maple inlays?

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2544 posts in 1567 days


#4 posted 269 days ago

I’ll expand on my answer a little. I choose spraying as it will not leave any brush marks, also, for any awkward contours where you’d have difficulty getting a brush, roller or cloth in, spray fits the bill. The trouble is, I don’t know what rattle cans are available in your neck of the woods. I have used and been disappointed by water based clear coats out of a rattle can, but that might be due to the limited selection over here – but if you go into a car spares/accessories shop and pick up an aerosol of cellulose lacquer, you might be in with a chance of achieving the finish you desire. (Don’t spray it indoors) The alternative would be to apply a poly finish, wait for it to cure and rub out the finish with auto rubbing compounds, but it all depends on how much you are willing to put into the job.
If you are going the auto route, get it all sanded down to say 220/240 first, wipe off with MS and try and get a good wet coat on without any runs, let it dry and if it needs denibbing, give it a light rub before applying a second coat.
If you’re not used to doing stuff like this, practice first until you’re confident enough to do it without making a mess of it.

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chrisstef

10390 posts in 1604 days


#5 posted 269 days ago

Deft high gloss lacquer would be my choice. In a rattle can.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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2544 posts in 1567 days


#6 posted 269 days ago

^I would go with anything that Chrisstef recommends

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scrapbmxrider16

19 posts in 278 days


#7 posted 269 days ago

Went with some Minwax spray poly both for convenience and prince.

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crank49

3337 posts in 1569 days


#8 posted 269 days ago

I was referring to the metal part.
Of course you would not paint walnut and maple.
Never occurred to me you were asking about finishing the wood part.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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