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Tenons too loose?

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Forum topic by CrazeeTxn posted 10-28-2013 12:31 AM 532 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CrazeeTxn

150 posts in 696 days


10-28-2013 12:31 AM

So I’m in the process of building a bed for my son. He wanted a raised panel bed. Gave me a pic and so I’m off to the races…

My problem is, I put the cart before the horse. I cut the tenons on the stiles then didn’t pay attention when I cut the grooves on the rails. Now the stiles are kind of loose. Meaning it’s not a snug fit.

I realized my error before I gut the groove in the legs, so I’m good there. Question is, I’m going to glue the stiles to the rails and the panels will float. Do you think it will be ok, or should I cut more stiles and make them fit snug? I work with rough lumber, so if I need to make more, I’m going to have to work the roughness out :)

As always, the advice is much appreciated.


10 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6968 posts in 1660 days


#1 posted 10-28-2013 01:31 AM

I have had to shim a couple of M/T joints when this happened to me before. If you have thin stock that will already fit then you are good to go. If not, I might suggest widening the groove to fit what thin stock you have or could make.

An alternative would be to glue additional stock to the tenons and re-cut the tenons to fit the existing grooves. Just an idea…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Loren's profile

Loren

7822 posts in 2394 days


#2 posted 10-28-2013 01:32 AM

Too thin tenons have happened to me plenty. I usually glue
some veneer or thin stock to one or both faces of the tenon
and let it dry, then re-cut the tenon cheeks.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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CrazeeTxn

150 posts in 696 days


#3 posted 10-28-2013 02:09 AM

First thought was glue up some smaller pieces. But there 16 of them and were only talking less than 1/8”. Might get a roll of veneer tomorrow and see how that works out. Didn’t think about that. Was trying to figure out how I’m gonna plane pieces to 1/16” :-)

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Loren

7822 posts in 2394 days


#4 posted 10-28-2013 02:15 AM

Oh, just rip a board then move your fence in 1/16” + the
thickness of your saw blade.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Thalweg's profile

Thalweg

69 posts in 2152 days


#5 posted 10-28-2013 02:18 AM

You might try gluing with polyurethane glue (Gorilla Glue). It’ll expand to fill the joint.

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

153 posts in 740 days


#6 posted 10-28-2013 02:33 AM

Usually I just glue on some thin veneer but do so on both sides of the tenon so it is not offset.
Alternatively, you can drill out the tenon and turn it into another mortise. Then use loose tenons. If you go the latter route, I suggest test cutting a mortise on throw-away stock first so you make sure you get the size right.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1323 days


#7 posted 10-28-2013 03:16 AM

Depends on how loose.
Using epoxy is an option.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3554 posts in 1559 days


#8 posted 10-28-2013 03:25 AM

Look at your design. If the tenons in question are needed for proper structure and support, then they should be shimmed or replaced. If they are largely decorative based on their location, then a little loose might be okay.
For example many of the parts on my panel beds don’t even exist on most beds, so there are plenty of other parts for a solid structure.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

808 posts in 1055 days


#9 posted 10-28-2013 03:52 AM

Too thin tenons have happened to me plenty. I usually glue
some veneer or thin stock to one or both faces of the tenon
and let it dry, then re-cut the tenon cheeks.

+1

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View CrazeeTxn's profile

CrazeeTxn

150 posts in 696 days


#10 posted 10-28-2013 11:30 PM

Not sure if they pieces were structurally needed as the sides are glued into the legs. It was more a piece of mind I reckon.

I carefully cut some thin pieces on the miter saw, glued them up, and presto, instant snuggation.

Thanks for all the replies. Guess I should quit over analying stuff and just go with my gut.

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