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Please help me name this old mortice chisel

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Forum topic by kaerlighedsbamsen posted 10-27-2013 04:44 PM 1335 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


10-27-2013 04:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question mortice chisel

When finishing this stool I went through my old tools and found this nice mortice chisel:

It came with the house my family bought in ´82 that had belonged to a painter. After a bit of love it looked really nice. But it has no name. There are only a small icon:

It appears to be a craftsman holding a carpenters square. Have newer seen it before and got a bit curious. What i think i know:
- From his clothes i guess the man to be french/german
- The chisel is handforged and probably made before WW2
- The handle is beech
- From the size (l:330mm, handle: ø42mm, blade: 11mm wide) i am guessing it is for cunstruction joints or larger windows/doors

I would love to hear you opinion

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda


14 replies so far

View GOOD LUCK TO ALL's profile

GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 1193 days


#1 posted 10-27-2013 05:33 PM

Call it Frank

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racerglen

3112 posts in 2245 days


#2 posted 10-27-2013 06:27 PM

Frank is commonly known as a “pigsticker” a heavy duty mortice chizel.
as far as who made him and when I have no idea, your German/French ideas are as good as it gets for me.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#3 posted 10-27-2013 06:37 PM

Frank the Pigsticker it is then.

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#4 posted 10-27-2013 07:03 PM

(said in my best Aussie accent) THAT’S not a “pigsticker”

Now THIS … is a “pigsticker”

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Francois Vigneron

263 posts in 1784 days


#5 posted 10-28-2013 05:27 PM

I can’t recognize that special sign but it looks like an emblem of what we call “Compagnons” in France, i.e. a guild of craftsmen that dates back to the middle ages but is still active here.

Here are two articles (one in english, second one in french) about it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compagnons_du_Tour_de_France
http://www.charpentiers.culture.fr/leshommes/lescompagnons/lecompagnonnageenfrance

It might have been some other guild too, or maybe has nothing to do with that…

Anyway, it’s funny that this type of mortise chisel is actually called an “english” chisel in France :)
Tell us if you find about the sign.

-- Francois Vigneron, Gif-sur-Yvette, France & Altadena, CA

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#6 posted 10-28-2013 06:21 PM

That is realy interesting, Francois. A bit like these guys: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=da&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=da&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fda.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FNaver_%2528h%25C3%25A5ndv%25C3%25A6rker%2529
To this day they share the tradition that you need to travel and see differnt ways to work in order to really master a craft. Only they have to go all over Europe.

Danish traditional craftmanship is heavily influenced from germany and i start to learn that there is a whole other style and tradition in France. Exiting new things to learn about!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#7 posted 10-28-2013 07:36 PM

Btw here it is called a Lokbejtel after german: Lochbeitel

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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jacobwilson8

4 posts in 1135 days


#8 posted 10-30-2013 05:54 AM

That’s an old chisel right there an vintage one .but not many use them these day because of the different chisel in the market.

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#9 posted 10-30-2013 03:11 PM

My guess is that there is not many of them around these days becuse these days we have these: http://service.mafell.de/index.php?IdTreeGroup=12982&IdProduct=8305

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1907 days


#10 posted 10-30-2013 05:43 PM

Post photos over here:
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/25043

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#11 posted 10-30-2013 07:22 PM

Thanks randy- was not aware of that thread. Item posted!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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theoldfart

8121 posts in 1916 days


#12 posted 10-30-2013 08:10 PM

Some of us still use them:

They can chop a mortise or tenon pretty quickly

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#13 posted 10-30-2013 09:07 PM

Lovely to see them in use!
How do you prevent the handle from cracking when hitting it? Or perhaps yours are made to be used more carefully than what i have seen local, old carpenters do; they grab the large mallet and go pretty much directly through the beams..

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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theoldfart

8121 posts in 1916 days


#14 posted 10-30-2013 09:14 PM

Pretty much the same. I use a wooden mallet (cherry, you can see it in he back ground), and I’m not very gentle! One of them has a repaired check in the handle from a long time ago. You do have to be reasonable in the depth of you cut relative to the hardness of the stock and keep them sharp.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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