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How should I lay out this trim?

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Forum topic by noone posted 270 days ago 782 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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noone

410 posts in 867 days


270 days ago

I am working on an applied molding project around our house which consists of a upper rail and picture frames and just got to my first question.

How should I handle what is in the pic here?

Do I need to pull out the old baseboard around the stairs and lay in a new piece of baseboard at an angle across the stairs and cut in the top pieces with a compound miter to match the angle of the baseboard?

Is this the way to go? Keep in mind that I would like to also put in a small picture frame in this area as well.

Are there any better ways to handle this?


17 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

3211 posts in 451 days


#1 posted 270 days ago

Do you intend to make your pic frame in that area square or to match the angle of the rail. You may consider running your rail level with the long rail and dead end it into the door casing. Then redo the base trim by the stairs in the same manner, keep it level with the other base. You will have to fill in the space under the base all the way down to the stairs. Then you can make a square pic frame on the short wall. Just what I might do or make it all tie together.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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noone

410 posts in 867 days


#2 posted 270 days ago

The square will need to match the angle of the rail and the baseboard.

I don’t think I can leave the rail at the same level because the rail on the left side of the door continues around the room at 3 feet off the ground. I think it would look strange to have a rail on the right side of the door four feet high, while the left side of the door and rest of the room has a rail that is 3 feet high.

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firefighterontheside

3211 posts in 451 days


#3 posted 270 days ago

No that wouldn’t look good.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View GOOD LUCK TO ALL's profile

GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 322 days


#4 posted 270 days ago

Like this? Definitely not to scale, but I think you need to turn the corner with your top rail before angling it down. That way you can get the profiles to line up correctly.

View Richforever's profile

Richforever

739 posts in 2315 days


#5 posted 270 days ago

One option is to put a little block called a plinth block on the corner. It connects the rails, but by interrupting the curves of the moldings it makes the mind think it belongs there and is OK. I’ve used this when floors and walls are all wacko, and it looks good.

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

View Jim Baldwin's profile

Jim Baldwin

49 posts in 953 days


#6 posted 270 days ago

I like what Kevin has drawn but perhaps you should alter the bottom base to match the upper detail. That would have been more correct as the moldings would then form a trapezoid, as would be correct going up any stairs.

-- Jim Baldwin/18th Century Handrail http://handrailer.com/

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kdc68

1933 posts in 872 days


#7 posted 270 days ago

+1 KevinJeffery…...he has solved your dilemma IMO

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Bogeyguy

456 posts in 663 days


#8 posted 270 days ago

Kevin nailed it.

-- Art, Pittsburgh.

View levan's profile

levan

397 posts in 1574 days


#9 posted 270 days ago

From the picture it appears like the top molding is deeper- thicker than the casing on the door. You may need to narrow it up all around the room so it dye’s in to the casing properly. I like Kevin’s drawing, you might also consider matching the base.

-- Lynn "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

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realcowtown_eric

288 posts in 532 days


#10 posted 270 days ago

That’s a curved double unequal and possibly variable angle compound angle cut to be sure! If indeed it can be done.

In my pea-brainjust Has to be cut by hand. Gotta read some of the old joinery books and get out some drafting tools to generate the curve on paper. ...you line up the intersections of the moulding details to generate the curve!....No other way! I’d have to go looking for the exact reference, but it’s a common dilemma in Joinery in european houses. A tome titled ” circular joinery” springs to mind, but I cannot remember the author ? Hodgson, Fred

But, to be optimistic, you can mock up the joint and cut and recut until the joint works, then just cut to length on the back lengths….and don’t blow the copes!

Dewalt don’t have a saw for that !!!

If I was paying you, I’d opt for just a return on the main wall portion. If you don’t know how to do the joint, it will take hours to figure it out and finesse it to an acceptable level.

Clearly a joint that if you pull of you can be proud of, and it may NOT be even possible, and if someone else is paying the tab, they will be damned incensed at the cost of making it work.

An interesting conundrum to be sure. Let us know the bottom line.

-- Real_cowtown_eric

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noone

410 posts in 867 days


#11 posted 269 days ago

I think I do like Kevin’s idea. The bonus with his method is that I don’t have to redo that piece on the main wall either.

Question-
In general, for the most part, I have been doing returns at the ends when this molding hits a casing. for the left hand side of this molding where it ends at the casing, should I just do a return at an angle? I’m thinking this compound cut should be possible. I’d like the rail/apron to be square to the casing when it returns.

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1199 posts in 1032 days


#12 posted 269 days ago

I like to do the return like this.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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tefinn

1199 posts in 1032 days


#13 posted 269 days ago

This is the better looking, but more complicated way.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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noone

410 posts in 867 days


#14 posted 269 days ago

I do my returns like the first picture as well.

My question was how do I cut a return on an angle?

You know, the more I think about it, maybe I should cut the rail, from right to left, horizontal one inch, angle down, then horizontal one inch. That may look good.

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tefinn

1199 posts in 1032 days


#15 posted 269 days ago

Sorry, I read the question wrong. What you have figured is the way to do it. Come around at the top with a small straight piece, then angle down. At the bottom, level the angle towards the door with a small piece and end with the return towards the wall.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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