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Shop wiring and walls

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Forum topic by UpstateNYdude posted 276 days ago 813 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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UpstateNYdude

420 posts in 580 days


276 days ago

Ok so I’ve finally scrapped together enough money in my secret stash to finalize my garage walls, I already have the R13 wall insulation it’s 2×4 studs. Now my question is should I use 1/2” plywood or 3/4” plywood on the walls and should I run conduit on the outside of the walls or leave the existing runs in the walls…yes I will be hanging stuff on the walls.

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor


16 replies so far

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

471 posts in 1127 days


#1 posted 276 days ago

Putting electrical in the walls is cheaper and keeps your walls free, but conduit or surface mount gives you the flexibility to make easy changes down the road. In something the size of a typical 2-car garage, I’d just put in-wall outlets every 6 feet and be done with it.

The real question is 120 or 240 :-)

If you want to hang stuff on the walls without bothering to look for studs, use 3/4” plywood. That extra 1/4” makes a huge difference in holding a screw. For heavy stuff, you’ll still want to look for a stud, though.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View welcon's profile

welcon

79 posts in 597 days


#2 posted 276 days ago

Just went through the wiring thing in my new shop. I had far to many circuits to run on the outside of the wall, so they are all buried in the 2X6 walls. looks a lot neater too.

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

170 posts in 429 days


#3 posted 275 days ago

I ran all of the electrical in my 2×4 stud walls (16oc) before adding insulation. I spaced duplex 120V outlets at 4’ intervals on each wall, 50” above the floor and put each wall on a seperate breaker at the panel. I ran individual 220V circuits to locations where I knew I needed them or might need them, each one on a seperate breaker.

For wall covering, I used 1/4” white pegboard on the upper 4’ and 1/4” lauan ply on the bottom 4’. If I need to hang anything really heavy on a wall, I can hit a stud very easily. Using white pegboard brightened the shop considerably without having to paint the walls. I left the lauan unfinished – this is a shop, after all.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

508 posts in 626 days


#4 posted 275 days ago

nick.. look in my blog/projects to see how i did electrical in my garage.
i opted to go wiring in the wall because romex 14/2, 12/2, 10/3 was noticeably cheaper than purchasing conduit and THHN (?) wire.
if you decide to go thru the walls, there are do’s and dont’s, things to expect, pro’s and con’s.
definitely consider writing down a map of machinery location and future locations to add 220v wiring. i have 4 220v outlets. and consider putting a alternative outlet in the ceiling for drop cords. and lighting. and bleh bleh bleh :) the list goes on forever.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2716 posts in 1840 days


#5 posted 275 days ago

If you decide to go with wiring in-the-wall, take some pictures for future reference in case you want to cut an opening in the wall for a window or a DC pipe.

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MrRon

2716 posts in 1840 days


#6 posted 275 days ago

If you decide to go with wiring in-the-wall, take some pictures for future reference in case you want to cut an opening in the wall for a window or a DC pipe.

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 489 days


#7 posted 275 days ago

Totally agree with MikeK above.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

420 posts in 580 days


#8 posted 275 days ago

I have both 120v and 220v I have 100amp service and I have about 5 220v lines spread around the garage only 2 used at anyone time (DC and whatever tool I happen to be at) so no danger there, I think I’ll just draw layout lines of the wire paths and the studs and put up 3/4” and keep the in wall stuff.

Thanks guys

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

508 posts in 626 days


#9 posted 275 days ago

if going thru the studs, like what i did…

get a heavy duty right angle drill to drill your holes in a straight line all the way across if possible.
you maybe have single and double 2×4’s studs to go thru.
might hit a nail so will have to go up or down 1/4”
remember to drill dead center of stud with a 1/2” bit or upto 5/8” bit (i forget which is max).
if you foresee some future nails or screw penetrations near the pathway on the 2×4, install nail-guard.
you can fit a 10/2 and 10/3 thru a single 1/2” hole, or 2 12/2’s thru a 1/2” hole.
wear gloves :) i had lots of cuts and slices from the exterior stucco wall nails poking at my hands.

View jackthelab's profile

jackthelab

306 posts in 1290 days


#10 posted 275 days ago

I went through the studs for my wiring. I covered my walls with 1/2” OSB and painted it. Everything came out pretty well. IMHO – don’t really like to see the conduit unless in a pole shed.

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

280 posts in 708 days


#11 posted 275 days ago

Remember that plywood wall covering won’t pass code in a lot of areas and it can be a serious fire hazard compared to drywall.

-- James

View GT350's profile

GT350

265 posts in 578 days


#12 posted 275 days ago

I went with drywall and put conduit in the walls. Now if I decide that I need heavier or more circuits I can just pull new wires through the conduit. It made the electrical inspector happy also, he said it wasn’t often he sees conduit in residential garages.
Mike

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1638 posts in 1519 days


#13 posted 275 days ago

I prefer conduit on the wall surface but in either case I recommend four-plex instead of duplex outlets.

-- In God We Trust

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1199 posts in 1034 days


#14 posted 275 days ago

+1 on what JADobson said. If you have an attatched garage shop you can’t use wood on the walls and pass code in most areas. Sometimes outside walls can get away with wood covering. If you have living space above the garage that’s an even bigger no-no.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

420 posts in 580 days


#15 posted 274 days ago

My garage is detached and one of my friends is the code enforcement officer for the town, I already asked and he said it is fine so long as the building is detached and more then 10ft from another structure which it is in both cases.

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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