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Forum topic by dan_fash posted 186 days ago 757 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dan_fash

47 posts in 1932 days


186 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: door construction butt joint

I’ve been tinkering with the idea of replicating some old (100yr+) doors. I’m trying to make a decision on construction type. I don’t want to do laminated, because the edges of the door would give away that it is new construction. Traditional r&s doesn’t fit the look I’m going for. Think old castle doors. I’d like my doors to be able to be exterior doors, which I know get about as much abuse as possible, and especially have to be warp resistant, and excellent fitting. I read a simple article on door construction (motherearthnews.com I believe) that talked about a 3rd construction style they simply called joined. Basically they describe glued butt joints of long planks, but with 4 threaded rods bolted through and through.

www.motherearthnews.com/diy/build-wooden-door-zmaz90ndzshe.aspx

Anybody have any input here? The idea seems solid, but really I’m at a loss…

Thanks for your help

Dan

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis


17 replies so far

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dan_fash

47 posts in 1932 days


#1 posted 185 days ago

No door builders out here that could help me?

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis

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Don W

13961 posts in 1073 days


#2 posted 185 days ago

there is a million ways to skin this cat and it really depends on what your expectations are. Even 100 years ago doors came in all shapes and sizes and styles and construction. Maybe post a picture of what you’d like to replicate.

I had a hard time deciphering what the question really was.

I’ve seen doors that were simple 2” oak planks fastened together. Old and fantastic looking, and worth a fortune, but I’m not sure i’d want one on my weather tight house.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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a1Jim

109551 posts in 2083 days


#3 posted 185 days ago

Hi Dan
I learned doormaking from my father in law who stopped making doors in his 70s and started at the age of 10.He made doors and windows for movie stars,Disney land and many high end homes.
His solution for making door that did not warp (particularly large doors) was to joint short pieces of wood for styles (best to use quarter sawn wood) then use 1/4” veneer on the faces and on the edges mitered to be undetectable and yes on large doors(some as large as 12’tall and over 5’wide) he would hide threaded rods routered through the rails inside the door.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1475 days


#4 posted 185 days ago

The problem with the construction method you want is the ‘excellent fitting’ part.
How would you account for seasonal movement on an exterior door, even with the threaded rods?
In this instance I think an engineered approach is required, like Jim mentions, with veneering on top.

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dan_fash

47 posts in 1932 days


#5 posted 185 days ago

The weathertight really is the crux… On the interior doors, nor really an issue. Jim, when you say he jointed short pieces for the stiles, do you mean that in the span of one stile, there were several smaller pieces?. I’ve seen some door construction where there was in essence 3 layers of 3/4” stock laminated and overlapping. I guess that’s where I really need to focus. The 1/4 inch veneer won’t work, as I do some very deep distressing, but making the outer layer 3/4 oak would prob work.

If I’m putting a speak-easy into the door (prob a small double pained window really) should I frame that into the layers, or just cut it out from the completed door?

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis

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a1Jim

109551 posts in 2083 days


#6 posted 185 days ago

Dan
I should have made it a little clearer. He actually glued finger jointed short pieces together for the stiles ( I’d guess 8-10”) and then veneered the the 1/4” on the faces and after thinking about it the edge may have been thicker than 1/4”. I think you could probably make the face veneer thicker. The key point on the face veneer is that it’s thick enough so when you mill the material the veneer doesn’t show.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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dan_fash

47 posts in 1932 days


#7 posted 185 days ago

Sounds interesting. Is there a structural benefit to finger jointed short pieces over single piece stiles if they are a layer in a lamination?

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis

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a1Jim

109551 posts in 2083 days


#8 posted 185 days ago

The benefit is that you have small pieces that have different wood grains ,this eliminates one piece of wood twisting and cupping on the stiles making a much more stable door. The finger jointing makes it a continual piece that have lots of glue surface on the end grain rather than just laminating over separate pieces you try and glue end grain to end grain .
If you have a router table and a finger joint router bit you can do the finger joints with that or better yet a shaper and the right blades.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Loco

210 posts in 255 days


#9 posted 185 days ago

Outdoor ? 2” solid heartwood teak or mahogany.Or use both.Got a lathe ?

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

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Loco

210 posts in 255 days


#10 posted 185 days ago

I like glass on external doors but dunno about up’ar in Methlehem. These are about a simple-elegant as doors get.
One way mirror ;-). I can see you but you can’t see me !

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

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a1Jim

109551 posts in 2083 days


#11 posted 184 days ago

Interesting and unique doors Loco,nice work.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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shipwright

4671 posts in 1304 days


#12 posted 184 days ago

This one works very well for me and I think it is the style you are looking for. It is a glue up but you have to look very closely to find the glue lines. Mitering the edges as Jim says would work even better but no one has ever noticed the joints in mine yet unless I showed them.
It has stood up for several years in a Canadian environment and has not changed shape or size at all.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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a1Jim

109551 posts in 2083 days


#13 posted 184 days ago

I remember seeing that in projects ,great job Paul.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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JustplaneJeff

142 posts in 409 days


#14 posted 184 days ago

I recently built 7 doors for our towns theater which is on the historic registrar. I laminated white oak for my cores, and used mortise and tenon joinery. I then skinned both sides with QSWO 5/16 thick which made for almost invisible lines on the edges. That job was completed almost 1 1/2 years ago and the doors are still just fine. There is a few picts of this on my projects page if you would like to look. Good luck with your project

-- JustplaneJeff

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John Ormsby

1263 posts in 2243 days


#15 posted 184 days ago

You can get very flat and warp free doors if you laminate the boards and then mill them to shape. For example:

triple lamination would serve most door construction. mill 3 boards to 5/8” thick by say 5 1/2” wide and 8’2” long

These 3 laminate will serve for a stile on an 8’ door. Use resin glue such as Unibond 800 or West Systems Epoxy.

This will give you the waterproofing you will need for exterior applications.

Make up all of your parts in the rough dimensions and then mill both sides equally to final dimensions so you retain symmetry on the boards and door. This is an important step.

From there go to glue up and finish.

This is just an example. You can glue up very thick doors and not have any problems. You can even go to a 5 layer lamination if needed for even more stability.

Does it cost a bit? Yes. But you will get a high quality door that will last for a long time.

BTW, long threaded rods is a very good idea for larger doors. You might want to put in removable decorative plugs on them so they can be tightened once in a while.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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