LumberJocks

Finishing options for fall/winter

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by mds4752 posted 10-20-2013 12:01 AM 494 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mds4752's profile

mds4752

44 posts in 359 days


10-20-2013 12:01 AM

New woodworker here. What are most folks doing for finishing projects as the weather turns? Due to the fumes and combustibility, do most of you work your projects outdoors until its too cold? I don’t have a ventilation system, nor is one in the budget. I don’t have a heated garage but I can work on my screened porch.

Or does most everyone go ahead and work indoors?

The specific project I’m doing now is with spar urethane and for now, the highs are still in the 50’s & 60’s.

-- "Live each day as if it were your last; one day you're sure to be right." -- Lt Harry "Breaker" Morant


7 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1446 posts in 1011 days


#1 posted 10-20-2013 12:11 AM

Waterborne finishes.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View mds4752's profile

mds4752

44 posts in 359 days


#2 posted 10-20-2013 12:17 AM

Is there a waterborne finish suitable for finishing a piece of outdoor furniture? Will be in Nebraska weather. It was a toss up between spar varnish or spar urethane. I also read about teak oil but I heard more positive rec’s for the spar varnish.

-- "Live each day as if it were your last; one day you're sure to be right." -- Lt Harry "Breaker" Morant

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

795 posts in 743 days


#3 posted 10-20-2013 03:31 AM

Even in the cold finishes will dry but they’ll take a lot longer. Lacquer will still work. In some ways I prefer doing lacquer in the cold (I am brushing it) because the longer dry time allows it to level out better. I’ve brushed lacquer in below freezing temperatures. It takes a long time to dry but it does dry.

You can get varnishes to cure more quickly, even in the cold, by making sure you have lots of air circulation by the piece. The reason being that varnish cures by reacting with oxygen. The more oxygen the faster it goes.

Oil finishes don’t work so well in the cold though. I’ve put on raw tung oil in the cold. While it didn’t freeze it didn’t cure until spring. Same thing with oil/varnish blends like Danish oil.

Shellac still works in the cold because alcohol evaporates quickly, even in the cold.

A spar varnish is going to have more oil than an indoor varnish so it may be more problematic in curing.

I haven’t tried waterborne in cold temperatures yet. I suspect it will still work ok because there is glycol in there.

View mds4752's profile

mds4752

44 posts in 359 days


#4 posted 10-20-2013 04:43 AM

Purr master—thanks for the insights. I think I’ll give it a shot on my porch. Temps will be in the 50’s and there’s plenty of circulation. Can says 4 hours between coats but as you said, the temps may drag that out. I’m hoping to get by with just 3 coats so we’ll see how it goes.

-- "Live each day as if it were your last; one day you're sure to be right." -- Lt Harry "Breaker" Morant

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1773 posts in 1143 days


#5 posted 10-20-2013 01:06 PM

Purrmaster hit it, the solvent finishes will cure, it just takes longer. The evaporative finishes (lacquer/shellac) have no problem with very low temps. I’m not a big water borne guy (yet) but they may actually need warmer temps to coalesce.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

View mds4752's profile

mds4752

44 posts in 359 days


#6 posted 10-21-2013 12:47 AM

Well the first coat dried in about 4 hours. Gave it a light sanding w/some 220 and am going to put coat #2 on tonight. The temp was 63 today, and the low tonight will be in the 50’s so I should be good to go I hope. Shooting for 3 coats.

Excuse my ignorance but can you provide some examples of water borne products? I’m using Helmsman Spar Urethane for this project. I’m going to research this week some products by Waterlox for a book cabinet I’ll be starting next.

Thanks all.

-- "Live each day as if it were your last; one day you're sure to be right." -- Lt Harry "Breaker" Morant

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

795 posts in 743 days


#7 posted 10-21-2013 01:42 AM

Waterborne products are things like Minwax Polycrylic. If the can says that it cleans up with water than it’s a water based finish. Water base stuff will look a bit different than solvent based. Usually solvent based finishes have an amber color to them. Water base is typically “water clear” with very little color to it. This can throw you off if you’re used to solvent based stuff.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase