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Need help on a old timey looking finish for oak

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Forum topic by hoss12992 posted 10-17-2013 05:40 AM 1134 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


10-17-2013 05:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finish

I would like some advice on how to achieve a old timey antique finish on oak boards. Don’t want it dark, but rather a lighter color that looks 100 plus years old. Any ideas, comments or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks, Hoss

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn


18 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14228 posts in 996 days


#1 posted 10-17-2013 05:46 AM

Look at the weathering techniques used by Greg (cajon box sculptor). I think what he is doing may be what you are looking for.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


#2 posted 10-17-2013 06:34 AM

Thanks Monte

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View Keith Glass's profile

Keith Glass

8 posts in 532 days


#3 posted 10-17-2013 08:15 AM

Hi Hoss,

I saw cajon box sculptor.
It is looking bright yellow as you want light color on oak boards but, I think you should go for a bit dark color than that, so that the board will appear older.

-- Keith Glass

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hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


#4 posted 10-17-2013 09:13 AM

Thanks Keith

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1478 posts in 425 days


#5 posted 10-17-2013 12:03 PM

Hoss,
You might also try to introduce heat to the boards and then give it a clear finish. Try a few scraps with a tourch, sand, then finish.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


#6 posted 10-17-2013 04:33 PM

Thanks Mrjinx007, I will give that a try

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5110 posts in 1966 days


#7 posted 10-17-2013 05:33 PM

I have a couple of pieces of antique oak furniture and they both have that nice golden patina that comes with age. There are many finishing techniques available…some are more complicated than others and finishing is an art entirely by itself. One simple one that I like on oak is Boiled Linseed Oil prior to the final finish.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

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hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


#8 posted 10-17-2013 10:42 PM

Thanks Greg

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1186 posts in 954 days


#9 posted 10-17-2013 11:07 PM

The original technique was fuming with ammonia. Sounds dangerous though…

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

475 posts in 1245 days


#10 posted 10-17-2013 11:11 PM

I used watco dark walnut and a wipe on poly on my cabinet. It matches my refinished 90 yr. old red oak trim that had nothing but poly put on after stripping. If the color in the picture is what you are looking for.

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 901 days


#11 posted 10-17-2013 11:20 PM

Could try a little ebonizing using steel wool and vinegar. Gives the wood what I think of as antique-ish personality. Makes the grain darker and adds that touch of gray to it all… or black the longer you let it sit. I’m experimenting with that right now to match some old church pews I’m working with.

Another alternative is using ebony stain as a first coat. This may all be getting darker than what you are after though. But I thought I’d throw it out there since I just learned about it recently myself.

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2529 posts in 1009 days


#12 posted 10-17-2013 11:40 PM

Garnet shellac and black bison paste wax.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Keith Glass's profile

Keith Glass

8 posts in 532 days


#13 posted 10-18-2013 06:20 AM

Bondogaposis suggested a good idea.

-- Keith Glass

View hoss12992's profile

hoss12992

2759 posts in 551 days


#14 posted 10-19-2013 12:16 AM

Thank yall for all the help. Will be doing a number of test pieces

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 554 days


#15 posted 10-19-2013 12:51 AM

For giving wood an appearance of natural aging it’s hard to beat fuming it with ammonia. This is an advanced technique and extreme caution must be exercised but he results are well worth the trouble. By advanced I don’t mean technically difficult but that it’s not for novices who might not heed warning about the hazards. If the proper precautions are followed it’s simple and very effective. I have provided some links with basic info and some images.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/shopping/TechInfo.aspx?type=a&p=47277
http://www.djmarks.com/stories/djm/Fuming_Wood_47692.asp
http://www.flickr.com/photos/83258888@N00/335980714/http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/finishing-quartersawn-white-oak/

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