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HSS table saw sharpening?

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Forum topic by yahelarmster posted 313 days ago 511 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yahelarmster

9 posts in 323 days


313 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: table saw sharpening blade

Hello there, I am new to woodworking and recently bought a used table saw, the blade is HSS and is really dull, it’s making burning marks on the wood it cuts, i need to buy a carbide blade but was wondering if you guys know of a method to sharpen HSS blades manually, thanks.


8 replies so far

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hydro

208 posts in 379 days


#1 posted 313 days ago

It’s easy, and I do it often. Just file the tops of the teeth, making sure to keep the angles close to what they started. You can also file the gullet (face) of the teeth, but you will need a file that is round on one side. I keep a couple old steel blades around for cutting wood that may have nails. That way, I just cut through them and re-file the blade when done.

Now if you want nice smooth cuts, just go buy a new carbide tipped blade. The Freud “Diablo” series are good blades and will not empty your wallet.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


#2 posted 313 days ago

Just for your information; saw blades are not HSS (high speed steel). If they were, you wouldn’t be able to touch them with a file. The file is not hard enough. HSS has to be ground using an abrasive wheel. You may be able to touch-up the teeth with a saw taper file, but don’t expect too much. They really have to be sharpened on a saw filing machine. No one does it anymore because the time spent is not worth it.

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2276 days


#3 posted 313 days ago

Actually – for Table-saws, the 2 materials used for blades are either carbide – or indeed – HSS.

you can file/hone HSS saws using diamond stones or saw files. but with the acceptance of carbide blades these days, and the great selection/prices available it would make more sense to just go and get a new carbide blade all together (Oshlun/Freud/CMT are good options to name a few)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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hydro

208 posts in 379 days


#4 posted 313 days ago

The blades the OP is talking about are actually made from a high carbon steel and are relatively ease to file.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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knotscott

5419 posts in 2003 days


#5 posted 313 days ago

+2 on Purplev and Hydro’s suggestion to go for a new carbide tipped blade…it’ll be a significant upgrade for you. They’re not all created equal, so I’d skip the bottom dwellers, but for ~ $27 you can have a much better blade that’ll stay sharp for a much longer time.

Saw Blade Bargains

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


#6 posted 311 days ago

I repeat; HSS is not used on saw blades. A file, any file will not touch HSS. Take it from a machinist who uses HSS tooling all the time as in lathe and milling cutters. Here are some facts about HSS saw blades. They are not used for woodworking blades, like Forrest, Freud, Dewalt, etc. HSS blades are used in the metal fabrication trades. A cold saw is one that uses a HSS blade to cut steel and aluminum. The arbor holes on most HSS blades are 1” and larger. There are blades that resemble a saw blade, and cut like a saw blade, but are really milling cutters. They can vary from a few thousands of an inch to 1/2” or more thick. Blades used on woodworking machines are made of a high carbon steel (not HSS). I have sharpened them in the past using a saw blade filing machine. Trying to touch them up by hand filing won’t give very good results. Saw tooth geometry is ver precise if it is going to cut properly. Just one or two teeth that are out of line, can mess up your cut. I’m not trying to discourage you from trying to hand sharpen blades yourself. Try it and find out that it isn’t easy.

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hydro

208 posts in 379 days


#7 posted 311 days ago

MrRon, I think you are missing the point here. There is no argument that the wood saw blades are made of “High Speed Steel”, and that is simply a slip in terminology in the OP. As I said above they are simply a high carbon steel, and for the most part are not even heat treated. If the question is “Can they be sharpened by hand”, then it is most positively yes, as I have done this MANY times. Now the result is nothing that will create a cut that compares with even a budget carbide tip blade, the fact remains that it is EASY to sharpen a carbon steel blade so that it will cut quite effectively, if rather rough.

Ultimately, the answer to the OP is to just throw the old blade out and buy a new moderately priced carbide combination tooth blade and be done with it.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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yahelarmster

9 posts in 323 days


#8 posted 311 days ago

Thanks for the input guys, i bought a D*Walt carbide blade, and stored the old steel blade, but gave it a sharpening and it worked good enough while i was saving for the carbide one. Thanks a lot.

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