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Do I need new arbor bearings? Craftsman 113.22411 10 inch bench top

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Forum topic by Brodimus_Max posted 10-14-2013 10:29 AM 1498 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brodimus_Max

7 posts in 1170 days


10-14-2013 10:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw bearings craftsman vibration vintage

I recently picked up an old (50’s) craftsman saw from Craigslist for $50. It runs well and the previous owner kept it clean. It does have a pretty stout vibration while running. The tension on the belt is from the weight of the motor. If I lift the motor a bit to relieve tension, it purrs like a kitten. I am running th original pullies with a v- belt. I’m thinking that the old bearings probably need replacing with nice modern bearings. Any thoughts? It seems like more vibration than will be cured with a link belt.


6 replies so far

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Craftsman70

243 posts in 1589 days


#1 posted 10-14-2013 01:19 PM

Take the belt off and spin the arbor and the motor by hand. You might need to replace the bearings in one or both of those.

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Brodimus_Max

7 posts in 1170 days


#2 posted 01-21-2015 10:14 PM

Revisiting this old project. I took the saw apart to clean everything, repaint, and reassemble. When turning the arbor and motor by hand, neither of the bearings seem to have any wobble to them. This makes me believe that the source of the vibration was due to the previous owner’s makeshift motor mount fix which I discovered when disassembling.

Now the question is, while I have the saw apart would it be worthwhile to replace the original arbor bearings with modern bearings? I’m building an outfeed table with fence specifically for this saw, so I don’t want to have to take everything apart once it is all assembled, but I don’t have a good feel for the difference between these 50’s era bearings with grease cup and modern bearings. Input greatly appreciated.

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MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#3 posted 01-21-2015 10:22 PM

Yes.. replace the bearings since you have it apart already.. cheap and easy to do, and will give you the peace of mind knowing you will not have to address them again for a very, very long time. And bearings are bearings.. there is not much difference between bearings made in the 50’s and those today other than better quality.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Wait.. I just noticed you mentioned “grease cup”?!? If so, you might not be able to replace them with a ball bearing.. pictures or more info would be needed to determine what, if anything, you can do with them!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Brodimus_Max

7 posts in 1170 days


#4 posted 01-23-2015 05:02 PM

Brad, thanks for the reply. My concern was exactly what you pointed out. With bearings that are originally unsealed and greased w/ a grease cup, would I be ok replacing these with modern packed and sealed bearings and ignoring the grease cup assembly.

My thinking is that it should be fine, as all modern saws run on such bearings.

This PDF has a parts diagram and a paragraph about lubrication. I’m leaning towards pulling and replacing with modern bearings and abandoning the grease cup.

Does anyone have experience pressing bearings out of an arbor? I have a jet 1/2 ton arbor press that I’m hoping will do that job.

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/222/2203.pdf

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MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 01-23-2015 07:28 PM

I don’t see any reason a sealed bearing could not be used.. but since the manual only has a part number and not an actual bearing number or other info, you will most likely need to yank them and measure with some callipers to get it’s size (bore, OD and width of inner and outer races which sometimes are not the same). If you can find a sealed bearing the same size, you are good to go and can just remove or ignore the grease cups.

And you probably don’t even really need a press to get the bearings out or in.. I’ve removed/replaced a ton of bearings and have only once needed a press.. and I probably could have done it without the press, but I just happened to have one available at the time.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#6 posted 01-24-2015 01:52 AM

Aren’t bearings with grease cups sometimes sleeve bearings? If so, their outer diameter will be much less than any ball bearing. Actually, new sleeve bearings can be very smooth and quiet, even more so than ball or roller bearings. Unfortunately, when they wear, the shaft may wear as well, and it all becomes problematic.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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