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maple cross-cut tearout

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Forum topic by Michael Wilson posted 10-10-2013 02:13 AM 1152 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


10-10-2013 02:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: maple jointer tablesaw question

I’m at my wit’s end here. I’m sure this is a simple problem that I’m the last person to have unsolved.

The goal is end grain cutting boards.

I laminate maple 1”x2” staves side by side for what I refer to (for lack of a better term) as the primary lamination, leaving me with what one might call “a rough, edge grain board.”

I cross-cut that into 1.5” strips…and I’m sunk.

I’ve tried a cross-cut sled, a zero clearance inserts for my table saw (this one) and a whole lot of really peculiar “out of the box” (read: bloody insane) ideas.

The results of the first round of cross-cuts always has JUST enough subtle tearout along the length of the cut that I’d have to either sand it out from the side or the top. Either of which would leave me with inconsistent dimensions across the pieces.

I suppose I could overcut the widths, then run the result through a thickness planer. But that seems pretty ridiculous too.

Is this something I need a jointer to do right?

- Stumped


11 replies so far

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1905 days


#1 posted 10-10-2013 02:24 AM

What type blade are you using? It sounds as if the blade is the wrong type or dull. A good, sharp crosscut blade, with a ZC insert should be all you need to make a smooth cut.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


#2 posted 10-10-2013 02:42 AM

Definitely not using a special blade. I wonder if this wouldn’t do the trick.

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1905 days


#3 posted 10-10-2013 03:11 AM

That might be OK. I think you’ld be better off with one of these two.

http://www.amazon.com/Freud-LU88R010-10-Inch-Crosscutting-PermaShield/dp/B0000225UI/ref=sr_1_2?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1381374022&sr=1-2&keywords=freud+crosscut

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400444319603?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

Knotscott’s the blade guy on here. He could tell you what is exactly what you need.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1998 days


#4 posted 10-10-2013 03:21 AM

What blade are you using? When was the last time you cleaned it?

The blade you linked to is a good blade. I have it but only occasionally use it. The Freud 50T combo blade (here) is much more versatile and pretty much flawless at the type of crosscutting you are doing.

Aside – you do not want to run end grain through a thickness planer. Chances are you’d end up with a broken board, broken knifes/cutters or both.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


#5 posted 10-10-2013 02:03 PM

Yeah, when I made my first attempt at an end grain board last year I learned the planer lesson. I wasn’t sure if it would be the same issue with individual small pieces.

The blade I’m using is the one that came with the saw so…yeah, one way or another it needs a replacement for this task.

Why would the 60 tooth be a better choice than the 80?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#6 posted 10-10-2013 02:58 PM

If you’re crosscutting a stack of end grain blocks, aren’t you ripping the end grain? If I understand your process…...
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


#7 posted 10-10-2013 03:09 PM

The issue is showing up when I’m cutting the first laminations across the grain.

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1905 days


#8 posted 10-10-2013 05:50 PM

More teeth usually does equal smoother cut. The blades with fewer teeth listed, you get the same smooth cut with a cooler blade and better chip removal. This gives you less chance of burning and a qucker feed.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


#9 posted 10-10-2013 06:58 PM

Ah! I see. So it’s not that the pure result of the lower tooth blade is better so much as it’s likely to cost me something in other aspects. Yeah, I’ll buy that.

Cool, thanks.

That gives me enough information to head to the Big Box on my way home from work and see what they’ve got.

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1905 days


#10 posted 10-10-2013 07:44 PM

Knotscott is the guru of blades on LJs. You might want to read his blog on picking blades. Gets technical while being completely understandable. A very good read IMO.

http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

588 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 10-27-2013 02:48 PM

Sorry. I forgot to update with what I ended up doing:

At the risk of having used more dollars than sense I picked up both an 80 and 60 tooth Irwin blades.

The 80 cuts my little 1×2 maple pieces leaving an edge like glass. It’s crazy.

I expected the feed rate to be much lower than it is. Turns out it’s fine. I’m definitely going to want to set up some kind of sharpening system for this as I know how I treat my cutting tools.

Thanks for the help. I think this has solved that particular problem. Now, on to the next one.

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