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Filler for Maple?

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Forum topic by jasoncarpentry posted 10-07-2013 12:35 AM 940 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jasoncarpentry

136 posts in 2117 days


10-07-2013 12:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: maple filler cutting board

Until my skills improve in making end-grain cutting boards, I’ll continue to have small gaps after the final glue-ups. Right now, I’ve got a maple board in need of some type of filler. I’ve been collecting maple sawdust, and have screened it thru regular window screen to remove the larger particles. My intention is to mix the dust with glue (Titebond II or III), and use the resulting “paste” to fill in the gaps, using a putty knife.

Have any of you done this? If so, can you give me any tips, such as the best dust-to-glue proportion?

-- Jim in Tennessee


5 replies so far

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#1 posted 10-07-2013 12:38 AM

I’ve done that but the glue tends to cause blotching of the adjacent wood and the ‘filler’ is usually a lot darker than you want. I now use Timbermate Grain Filler.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Moron

5032 posts in 3356 days


#2 posted 10-07-2013 01:38 AM

Filler isnt allowed in my world

if it were

i would a add pure universal extra fine grind pigment to auto body “bondo” (minwax makes a food friendly version)

regardless………..the day will come when people look at the cutting board and will be thankful for it being there, as it serves food for the last time and they toss it into a wood stove for heat ?

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1711 days


#3 posted 10-07-2013 05:05 PM

I would think gaps big enough to warrant a filler would lead to structural integrity issues. With that said, I do have some tiny gaps from time to time. For light colored species, I’ve found gorilla wood glue (not the polyurethane stuff) works best. It’s water resistant (Type II) and dries pretty close to clear. Elmers wood glue max is a good choice for darker species. It is similar to Titebond III in strength and water resistance (Type I), but doesn’t affect finishes as drastically as any other PVA type glue I have used.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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jasoncarpentry

136 posts in 2117 days


#4 posted 10-07-2013 05:18 PM

Lumberjoe, do you mean that you use these types of glues without staining or adding stuff like maple dust to them?

-- Jim in Tennessee

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1711 days


#5 posted 10-07-2013 09:48 PM

Depending on the size of the crack. If it’s deep enough, I’ll use a glue/dust slurry. If it’s something no one will even notice but I do, I’ll smear a really light coat of glue over it, let it sit for a few minutes, then sand the whole thing with my ROS.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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