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Distressed Look Finishing Video?

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Forum topic by NorCalQ posted 10-06-2013 02:24 PM 593 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NorCalQ

17 posts in 522 days


10-06-2013 02:24 PM

I’m looking for a good youtube vid on distressing. The wife loves the stuff, so I told her I’d give it a try.


11 replies so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 786 days


#1 posted 10-06-2013 04:14 PM

Did you try searching for something like “video how to distress wood”?
I ran that one through Google and the first four hits were you-tube videos, one by that lady Amy something from that diy channel (HGTV?)

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NorCalQ

17 posts in 522 days


#2 posted 10-06-2013 06:09 PM

Yeah…I did the Google search and looked and few vids. Trouble is, I don’t know which one is good advice and which one isn’t.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 786 days


#3 posted 10-06-2013 06:16 PM

Well the one lady (Amy Devens, Devers?) has her own TV show and that’s all she does is that style, so I’d assume she knows what she’s doing or they’d have yanked her off the air by now.

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View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1170 posts in 2619 days


#4 posted 10-07-2013 08:09 PM

got a photo of what your looking to achieve, might be able to help , done it a time or a 1000, love it .

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NorCalQ

17 posts in 522 days


#5 posted 10-07-2013 09:25 PM

Charles, thanks for the reply. I don’t have a pic, but I can try to describe it. There are layers of paint that have been worn thru in areas, by what appears to be years of use, so the colors from the layers show thru. Hope this helps. I’ll try to find a pic that illustrates what I’m talking about.

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Charlie

38 posts in 460 days


#6 posted 10-07-2013 10:53 PM

Is this what you are talking about? On the cabinet I used a dark green bottom layer and then used a flat black for the top layer. you then use 60 grit sand paper to distress in the areas you want. On the step is just one layer of black paint and then 60 grit paper to distress.

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NorCalQ

17 posts in 522 days


#7 posted 10-08-2013 01:09 AM

That’s what I’m talking about. How do you determine what colors you’re going to use for top and bottom layers? Latex? How do you know where to sand and where not to? More pics please.

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Charlie

38 posts in 460 days


#8 posted 10-08-2013 02:57 AM

Witch ever color you want to be the dominate color goes on last so say if you want a more black color you can use a red or green or white as the first layer then put the black on last. The overall color will be black when you start distressing, the first layer color will appear as you sand that area. I only use water base latex paint. It’s much easier if you start sanding before the top layer is completely dry. It’s trial and error on where you sand and a lot has to do with just how much of a distressed look you want. I like doing the edges and in areas that you think would get normal everyday ware. You also can do the dry brush technique where you just use a very dry brush and lightly brush on the second color, then sand the edges to distress. It takes some practice but each time it gets easier My house is full of primitive décor. I will take more pictures of my other primitive projects and post for you to see in a day or so.

respectfully,

Charlie

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Charlie

38 posts in 460 days


#9 posted 10-08-2013 03:13 AM

I haven’t done this yet but looks cool on how to layer stains.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gm6NH7b5cSw

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1109 days


#10 posted 10-08-2013 08:05 PM

When I want that look, rather than go the sanding route, I use a damp sponge to selectively remove some of the top coat before it gets too dry. Depending on the size of the project and the ambient humidity, it may have to be done in sections, but it’s fast and easy. I use pieces of grout sponge that I wring out often in a bucket of water. Pieces of old towel can also be used. Never tried it with oil paint, but works great with flat wall acrylic (Behr). Topped with clear waterborne poly. See my Library Wall project for an example.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3582 posts in 2709 days


#11 posted 10-08-2013 08:51 PM

I’ve done a lot of pieces using a stain color of choice, top coat with a paint (latex or oil) color of choice, then sand, beat, gouge to replicate wear as much as the article call for. After all that, a clear coat if ya want.
Not too hard. Just takes some time and effort. I think it is more intuitive than technical.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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