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Forum topic by phlyers posted 10-06-2013 12:16 AM 665 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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phlyers

93 posts in 441 days


10-06-2013 12:16 AM

I’m using a 1/16” round over bit on a project but the bit has a bearing on the top of it and I want to use it on my router table. Am I correct in assuming that I need to remove the bearing when using this bit on a router table? I thought the bearing was used as a “stop” if you use it on a mobile router and the router table’s fence is the stop. Am I right?


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7550 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 10-06-2013 12:28 AM

You can do it either way. You’ll need to use featherboards to
press the work to the table to get the cut right with such
a small roundover.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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phlyers

93 posts in 441 days


#2 posted 10-06-2013 12:31 AM

Ok so I can take the bearing off for use in the table. Yea I just need a small round over. Basically its the same as just breaking the edge with sandpaper.

View bullhead1's profile

bullhead1

228 posts in 902 days


#3 posted 10-06-2013 12:33 AM

I would say if the bit with the bearing on achieves the results you are looking for I see no reason to remove it. You wouldn’t even need to use your fence in most cases.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10861 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 10-06-2013 12:43 AM

I use roundover bits with bearings in my router table all the time and have never taken the bearing off. Set you bit with the bearing just proud of the fence face or just use the bit without the fence.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2872 days


#5 posted 10-06-2013 01:18 AM

I always leave the bearing on, and can see no advantage to taking it off. I “zero” the fence by placing a straightedge against the bearing, and bringing the fence to meet the straightedge before tightening it in place.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Nygiants77's profile

Nygiants77

57 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 10-06-2013 01:21 AM

Basically its the same as just breaking the edge with sandpaper.

Unless you have alot of round over to do I would just sand it as you said.

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phlyers

93 posts in 441 days


#7 posted 10-06-2013 02:55 AM

Nygiants77—That’s exactly why i’m using a router for this. I make little kids stools and there’s 11 total pieces where I want every edge rounded over so yea..Lot’s of sanding that I don’t wanna do.

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bullhead1

228 posts in 902 days


#8 posted 10-06-2013 02:58 AM

Take your fence off and have at it.

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1979 posts in 930 days


#9 posted 10-06-2013 03:09 AM

phlyers.... using the fence in conjunction with the bearing on the bit is fine…gfadvm and Charlie are right on ….but if your work piece is curved or odd shaped then I recommend removing the fence and placing a starter pin in the router table plate ….here’s a helpful link to explain what a starter pin is and how to use it

http://www.newwoodworker.com/usestrtpin.html

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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phlyers

93 posts in 441 days


#10 posted 10-06-2013 03:27 AM

Thanks kds68. Only 2 pieces are curved but they would need round overs as well. Starter pin is perfect for this.

View RibsBrisket4me's profile

RibsBrisket4me

1376 posts in 1159 days


#11 posted 10-06-2013 03:30 AM

Yep…what KDC68 says…

-- http://www.PictureTrail.com/gid6255915

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