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New to me jet 10 hybrid saw

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Forum topic by Posty posted 10-05-2013 11:08 PM 650 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


10-05-2013 11:08 PM

So I just picked this jet 10 saw up, got it. From craigslist for $350. It runs on 110v and 220v. I have both available in my workshop, and obviously it’s better to run it on 220v. My question is, is there anything in particular I need to do to switch from 110-220v? I asked the previous owner of the saw and he said that the wiring coming from the on/off box is a little beefier. I don’t know if that’s the case cause I thought that if the same motor was running on 110 it would tend to pull more amperage and need bigger wiring, and if it was on 220 it wouldn’t pull as much amps? Anyways the saw seems to run pretty damn we’ll on 110, I tried it out and it has that nice whirling hum to it. Cleaned it up and plan on building a work table around it.


24 replies so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1212 posts in 659 days


#1 posted 10-05-2013 11:39 PM

I think you did really well. That looks like a solid saw with a good fence. Enjoy and…...you suck. Have fun

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

464 posts in 672 days


#2 posted 10-06-2013 12:56 AM

220v is generally better for the motor in the long run as it uses less amps so less heat and it might start up a millisecond faster and being that it is on a dedicated line you shouldn’t trip a breaker. But other then that 220 only requires 12ga wire (that’s not that beefy) and saves minuscule amounts of money off your electric bill…if you know what you’re doing switch it to 220v IMO but if not just leave it.

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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UpstateNYdude

464 posts in 672 days


#3 posted 10-06-2013 12:57 AM

Oh and congrats on the new saw!

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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RibsBrisket4me

1376 posts in 1195 days


#4 posted 10-06-2013 03:10 AM

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#5 posted 10-06-2013 03:13 AM

Thanks guys. It was in kind of rough shape as I got it in the shop, but I cleaned her up good. Found the manual and parts break down online. Coming along well. Just have to make a zero clearance insert and it will be ready to use.

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RibsBrisket4me

1376 posts in 1195 days


#6 posted 10-06-2013 03:24 AM

Honestly….I’d just run it on 110, unless you already had an unused 220 outlet in the shop.

That sucker will last you a long time.

-- http://www.PictureTrail.com/gid6255915

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#7 posted 10-06-2013 03:40 AM

I do have a 220 outlet. The previous owner said 220 rips thicker stock a lot better and it starts up better.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

38 posts in 401 days


#8 posted 10-06-2013 04:18 AM

Electric motors consume the same amount of watts wired for 110v as it does wired 220v. You will not see the savings on electric bill by going to 220v. The difference in efficiency is so slight it’s not even worth taking into account. Check the motor nameplate to see what HP it is and go from there. Your existing wiring could be fine for the saw. If it aint broke dont fix it.

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#9 posted 10-06-2013 04:30 AM

3hp

View dahenley's profile

dahenley

127 posts in 783 days


#10 posted 10-06-2013 04:36 AM

why do you call it a hybrid? does it have table or cabinet mounted trunions?
looks great! (i just picked up a 90’s Unisaw that needs a fence, but its deffinatly a huge jump from my craftsman…)

-- David Henley

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Charlie

38 posts in 401 days


#11 posted 10-06-2013 05:01 AM

A 3HP motor wired 115v will draw 34 amps at full load and 17 amps wired 230v. Investigate and see how your existing 110v circuits are wired. If they are 20 anp breakers and #12 wire that is not enough for a 3HP saw. Do you know the wire and breaker size of the 220v outlet?

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#12 posted 10-06-2013 05:07 AM

Found the owners manual and it calls it a table saw. I’m pretty sure it’s all mounted to the the cabinet though. It says to align the blade to the miter slot to adjust the table top. So.. I guess it’s a cabinet saw?

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#13 posted 10-06-2013 05:09 AM

Wire size is #8 wire on both circuits and 2 20 amp breakers for both the 110 and 220.

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Charlie

38 posts in 401 days


#14 posted 10-06-2013 05:46 AM

#8 wire on a 20 amp circuit breaker is uncommon wiring practice.
“2 20 amp breakers for both the 110 and 220”
I can only assume that your 110v outlets are probably only rated at 20amps so you can not install a 30 amp breaker on the 110v circuit. But you could add a 30 amp outlet and a 30 amp breaker and rewire the saw for the 220v circuit.

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Posty

63 posts in 419 days


#15 posted 10-06-2013 06:00 AM

We’ll if each leg of the 220 outlet had its own 20 amp breaker wouldn’t that be enough since it pulls less amps?

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