LumberJocks

Turning chisel handles

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Ben posted 10-04-2013 10:39 PM 798 views 2 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


10-04-2013 10:39 PM

Hi,
I’ll be tu rning some replacement handles this weekend for my vintage socket chisels.

I use them mostly with a mallet for chopping dovetails and pruning/tuning/notching various stuff on-site in my carpentry.

I want to avoid the hassle of leather-tipped ends or brass hoops and this kind of stuff. So I’m wondering if you guys think Bubinga would be a decent choice for a handle that will be directly hit with the mallet and hold up awhile? I have some kicking around.

Thanks.


13 replies so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 694 days


#1 posted 10-04-2013 10:51 PM

This one has lasted me a few years. It’s been used with a small wooden mallet and a BIG leather mallet and the end is about as smooth as the day it came off the lathe. It’s not a mortise chisel though so if you’re looking for something you can bang on with a 10 pound sledgehammer I can’t guarantee the same longevity.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


#2 posted 10-04-2013 11:07 PM

Thanks JustJoe. Nice handle.
What is the largest diameter on that?

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 694 days


#3 posted 10-04-2013 11:17 PM

If you’re looking to copy the shape, fattest part is 1-3/16, right at the socket is 23/32 and the total length is a skosh over 4-3/4”. But I have small hands.
A good tutorial on getting the socket part to fit just right is here:
http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/jthompson/restore/ChiselHandles/socketHandle1.asp

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View Homebrew's profile

Homebrew

64 posts in 842 days


#4 posted 10-06-2013 12:06 PM

Ben, I have some chisels with bubinga handles that have held up quite well. I just finished all the chopping (after fret sawing) on a 7/8 thick case that had 16 tails. All with one of those chisels. Brass hammer. No problems with the handle whatsoever. I think a lot though has to do with the end of the chisel and how the end is shaped, mine are shaped similar to Joe’s. Think about what the face of the hammer will be hitting as it makes impact.

-- Scott Rieman

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


#5 posted 10-06-2013 02:38 PM

Thanks guys.
Turned 3 yesterday of slightly different lengths. Will post photos later.

Any tips for removing old handles that have been epoxied in? Drill out as much as I can and soak it in lacquer thinner or something?

View Don W's profile

Don W

15037 posts in 1224 days


#6 posted 10-06-2013 03:00 PM

A little heat sill soften most epoxies.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Tim's profile

Tim

1269 posts in 618 days


#7 posted 10-06-2013 06:13 PM

A little is the key. I think your average epoxy softens at 150 degrees F or something. Go too hot and you’re risking having that heat go down to the working end to mess with the steel’s temper. Go easy with a heat gun or dip in heated mineral oil.

Soaking long enough in acetone may work too.

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


#8 posted 10-07-2013 02:29 AM

Thanks. The MAPP torch worked great in a matter of seconds on both chisels. No apparent harm to the steel.

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


#9 posted 10-07-2013 11:28 PM

Here’s a few Bubinga handles from the other day:

They feel great in the hand, but I wish I had taken more care to make them all the same. Ah well.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2753 days


#10 posted 10-07-2013 11:31 PM

They look great Ben. Nice form.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View planeBill's profile

planeBill

480 posts in 1065 days


#11 posted 10-08-2013 09:28 PM

yep, sweet looking handles, I like the shape too. Very graceful looking.

-- I was born at a very young age, as I grew up, I got older.

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

394 posts in 1654 days


#12 posted 10-08-2013 09:57 PM

Derek Cohen has an excellent write up on making replacement handles for socket chisels. It is located about 1/2 down on this page: In the Woodshop.

My lathe skills (and edge tools) basically suck, but I was able to get nearly a perfect fit the first time. His trick is to use a drill bit to assist in measuring the inside bottom diameter, as well as the depth. The top diameter can easily be measured with a calipers or a ruler in a pinch.

Someday, I will get proficient enough to actually be able to make useful, attractive and comfortable handles, not the stubs I created the first time.

Greg

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1513 days


#13 posted 10-08-2013 10:41 PM

Thanks Guys.
I actually found the taper for the socket the easiest part. I measured depth with my thumb on a pencil, transferred that to the blank. Calipers set to the large diameter, turn down to that, eyeball a taper. Take the piece on and off and twist it on the socket to make reference “smudges.” Then turn away the high spots. Real easy.

I’ve done lots of turning of much more complex looking stuff and actually find it to be easier because there are “fillets” or transition flat spots. With these it’s just one long shape, nowhere to really “connect the dots” as it were.

Thanks.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase