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A dane asking anbout Danish Oil..

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Forum topic by kaerlighedsbamsen posted 10-03-2013 08:52 PM 1123 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


10-03-2013 08:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: danish oil

Funny thing- here in Denmark there is no such thing as Danish Oil. But then what is it exactly?
There is a lot of talk about that stuff here and it sounds like just what i am looking for for finishing projects. But in order to be able to buy it i need to know what it is.

Do you know whats inside and what it is called (and perhaps how you can make it yourself)?

Thanks!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda


16 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#1 posted 10-03-2013 09:00 PM

Danish oil is (in the States) most commonly a mixture of boiled linseed oil, mineral spirits and a varnish. When I mix my own, it’s simply 1/2 of each of those ingredients. While can’t tell what Rustin’s is composed of, I did see (on the MSDS) that its 70-90% Naptha, their thinner of choice apparently You might find this article by Bob Flexner of use.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2894 days


#2 posted 10-03-2013 09:06 PM

Fred…how do you use 1/2 of each of 3 items?? lol

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


#3 posted 10-03-2013 09:19 PM

Ahh so THAT is what it is. “Køkkenbordsolie”
Any particular kind of warnish for your recipie? (i assume it is a turpentine-based kind?)

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#4 posted 10-04-2013 12:15 PM

Gary, sorry having a senior moment…..I typed 1/3 each, have no idea how it showed up 1/2 each, LOL.
Dane, I usually use a non-poly varnish, because that’s what I always have on hand. My current stash is a lot of Cabot 8000, an alkyd/soya oil varnish. I think it’s been discontinued, others I’ve used are Pratt and Lambert 38 (hard to fins, same formula), Sherwin Williams Fast Dry Oil Varnish (alkyd/linseed oil), One I would like to try and haven’t is Waterlox Original, a phenolic/tung oil formula. As the green movement advances here in the States, these are all getting harder to find (not a complaint, just a fact). I’m confused by your turpentine based question, varnishes are oil and resin cooked together. Thinners are added after the fact, and here it’s typically contain a form of mineral spirits (stoddard solvent) to make them useable….is that what you mean?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


#5 posted 10-04-2013 12:41 PM

Thanks for clearing tings out, Fred!
What i am trying to say is if it is a water or oil based varnish you use. But you just answered that yourself.

I will certainly look into this some more and are looking forward to experiment in the shop. Great info- Thanks!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1430 days


#6 posted 10-04-2013 12:48 PM

Look for Swedish oil. Svenska olja. It’s much better. Just kidding, I love Danish Oil it’s probably my favorite finish, I think you will like it, and how easy it is to use too

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

914 posts in 1554 days


#7 posted 10-04-2013 01:19 PM

Danish oil is an oil/varnish blend. It doesn’t dry hard but it’s really easy to use. I use it as more a stain than a top coat finish. Watco’s “Black walnut” Danish oil works well for staining oak and hickory for me.

I always wondered why it’s called Danish oil? Now that we know the Danes don’t know why.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#8 posted 10-04-2013 01:21 PM

I think Danish oil can be just about anything linseed oil based from what I’ve seen. Most commonly now I think it is the linseed oil, petroleum distillate thinner (naphtha or mineral spirits, etc), and varnish mix. But I’ve seen pure polymerized linseed oil (no additives at all) also marketed as Danish oil. Not sure which one is the original meaning, but it only seems to matter whether you want varnish in it or not and whether you want the old school version or the modern. Some say the modern is better, others not.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4166 posts in 2317 days


#9 posted 10-04-2013 01:37 PM

What I call Danish oil.
2.5 lt Double boiled linseed oil
1.5 lt Pure Turpentine
250 ml of beeswax pellets
25 ml Carnauba wax (This was listed as brittle wax)
There is another recipe with shellac dissolved in the turpentine prior
to dissolving the waxes ( I could look it out if you wanted>)
We have used this for 4 generations as the main finish
Mads recently tried it and approved of my Danish oil while eating
Danish Bacon with Danish Butter
It was originally in imperial measures.
I’ve just made a 25 lt batch so I had the mix in my head

Rustins is a bit of a chemical coating, the formula has also changed recently.
A much more brittle finish, great for outdoor multi coat.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

914 posts in 1554 days


#10 posted 10-05-2013 12:13 AM

I’ve heard of polymerized tung oil but not linseed oil. Where did you see the polymerized linseed oil if I may ask?

View Tim's profile

Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#11 posted 10-05-2013 01:01 AM

It’s in that link purrmaster. As I understand it, that’s what drying oils like tung oil and linseed oil do, they polymerize. Heating linseed oil to the right temperature without oxygen changes the properties (partially does the polymerization reaction I believe, could be wrong) and you get boiled linseed oil. Longer and you get stand oil, which is mixed in at certain proportions to vary the properties. I think they are calling it pure polymerized linseed oil just to differentiate it from the stuff you get at the hardware or big box store that says “boiled linseed oil” on the can but has hydrocarbon distillates to thin it and metallic catalysts to make the oil dry more quickly.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


#12 posted 10-05-2013 02:36 PM

Thank you all for the great adwise!

@Kaleb: Ill certainly go check Svensk olja..;)
@Purrmaster: I gets worse than that. Danish pastry is not danish either and is here called “wienerbrød” (bread from Wienna)
@Jamie: That sounds like an recipie that is allmost edible. And i like your attitude- 25 liter in one batch is thinking big! If Mads has approved it ill go for this one. Regarding the double boiled linseed oil- is it the type with or without “dryer” added?

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3124 days


#13 posted 10-05-2013 02:52 PM

And here all of these years I have thought using Danish Oil was just a way to look out for my peeps!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View WoodDweller's profile

WoodDweller

36 posts in 1192 days


#14 posted 10-05-2013 03:48 PM

Fred, thats for the link. Im a Finnish guy that doesn’t understand Finish. That article made some sense of it though.

So “Danish oil” has nothing to do with Denmark? Its just an american marketing name invented in the 60s?

That is almost funny.

View LakeLover's profile

LakeLover

283 posts in 1400 days


#15 posted 10-05-2013 04:17 PM

Do they French Kiss in France ?

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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