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Forum topic by Medickep posted 10-03-2013 05:52 PM 1544 views 1 time favorited 57 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


10-03-2013 05:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: safety hearing protection protecting ears hearing resource

Awhile ago I purchased, which I thought, were decent over the ear hearing protection to protect the little hearing I have. I wear them whenever I’m using power tools, mowing the lawn, the wife is talking, ext.

After having my physical at work, I was reminded of the 6000k decimal loss I have. The same loss I had when I was hired 12 years ago and they said I would have a hard time hearing some children and woman speak (human upgrade!).

In the spirit of keeping the hearing I have, and finding this site, I’m wondering what a good standard is for hearing protection, as far as how many decimals it protects you from! Also not costing to much would be nice!

Thanks in advance,

-- Keith


57 replies so far

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crank49

3480 posts in 1689 days


#1 posted 10-03-2013 06:21 PM

Decibels are a unit of measure of sound pressure.
Humans generally can tolerate sounds under 80 to 85 decibels without discomfort or damage.
Sound llvel and length of exposure are additive. You might be able to tolerate 88 decibels for a few minutes but if you are exposed for 8 full hours you really need to be under 80.
I found a useful chart.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#2 posted 10-03-2013 06:34 PM

I like that chart it’s a good reference while I begin to shop for some hearing protection, but I’m a little curious about its accuracy since my router is wayyyyyy louder than my power drill!

-- Keith

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crank49

3480 posts in 1689 days


#3 posted 10-03-2013 06:55 PM

I’m sure there are exceptions. The point probably is that every one of the power tools listed was way above what a person should be exposed to.

I have lived with an 80% loss of any sound over 600 hertz since I was 19 years old. It was caused by my job at an automotive supplier in 1969.
There was no effort to protect worker’s hearing back in those days.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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firefighterontheside

5405 posts in 575 days


#4 posted 10-03-2013 07:02 PM

My wife is an audiologist and bought me some over the ear headphone/radio. I can check to see what the noise reduction rating(nrr) is for them. Incidentally for her final project for her masters degree(second one) she did a study of noise exposure in the fire service. Surprisingly she found it to be not that bad. As was previously stated its about time of exposure and sound level. We make loud noises but not for extended periods of time. I will have her look at the chart and explain the discrepancy you notice with your router and drill.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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firefighterontheside

5405 posts in 575 days


#5 posted 10-03-2013 07:09 PM

OK just checked. They have an NRR of 23.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#6 posted 10-03-2013 07:14 PM

firefighterontheside-

I would be curios to see which kind they were so I could look into them. I shouldn’t be surprised, but Woodcraft had some as high as 289.00 dollars.

Here are the ones I was looking at:

http://www.amazon.com/3M-Peltor-H10A-Optime-Earmuff/dp/B00009LI4K/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1380825681&sr=8-2&keywords=hearing+protection

The hearing lost I get the most, is in the fire house with my soon to be retiring Captain watching TV to loud! What????????

-- Keith

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#7 posted 10-03-2013 07:19 PM

Apparently the ones I was looking into have a NRR of 29 according to an article I found to see what a NRR was!

-- Keith

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firefighterontheside

5405 posts in 575 days


#8 posted 10-03-2013 07:32 PM

Here is what I have. The others had a higher rating, 30 according to amazon. I wear mine to cut grass, cut wood with chainsaw, etc. I like to have the radio on. I’m more likely to wear them that way. I think my wife would say that you only need to reduce the sound level to a safe level and there is no need to try and eliminate it altogether.

http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-RST-63005-Earmuff-AUX-Input/dp/B001ULCHD6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1380828394&sr=8-1&keywords=stanley+ear+muffs

Loud TV? My dad is that way. Retired firefighter. Never wore ear protection in his life. He also worked on and around jets in Vietnam.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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jmartel

2555 posts in 868 days


#9 posted 10-03-2013 07:33 PM

I’ve been looking at picking these up.

http://www.amazon.com/Howard-Leight-1030110-Noise-Blocking-Earmuff/dp/B004U4A5RU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1380828280&sr=8-2&keywords=hearing+protection+radio

$22, got lots of great reviews, and a rating of 25 instead of 23 like the other radio ones.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#10 posted 10-03-2013 07:39 PM

I do like that idea as I always have my iPhone on when I’m outside doing yard work. In the shop, I just have a radio for my iPhone! Better not have the music to loud or it may defeat the purpose of the hearing protection!!

-- Keith

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firefighterontheside

5405 posts in 575 days


#11 posted 10-03-2013 07:40 PM

For $22 its worth a shot.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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natenaaron

377 posts in 515 days


#12 posted 10-03-2013 07:41 PM

I’m pretty sure I would not want that mp3 cord hanging around.

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#13 posted 10-03-2013 07:44 PM

I use an MP3 player for yard work not wood work. I also run the cord under my shirt so it’s out of the way. I always use a shirt when doing yard work :-)

-- Keith

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Medickep

371 posts in 456 days


#14 posted 10-03-2013 07:47 PM

firefighterontheside-

I didn’t see your link at first. Those look great too, but a little more. I do have a radio in my phone now thanks to Apple!

-- Keith

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jmartel

2555 posts in 868 days


#15 posted 10-03-2013 07:52 PM

Nate,

When I’ve worn headphones in the past, I run the cable through the back of my shirt. That way it can’t hang down anywhere, and it’s not in front of me where the work/tools are.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

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